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Here's the text of a Neapolitan song that was first published in 1551, along with what I understand from it in English:

Chi la gagliarda donna vo' imparare,    | Ladies, who wants to learn the galliard,
Venit' a nui che simo mastri fini,      | Come to us, who are shrewd masters,
[Che de ser' e de matina                | Who from evening until morning
Mai manchiamo di sonare:                | Never stop playing:
Tan tan tan tarira, tan ti ru ra.]

Provance un poco                        | Try a little bit,
ca 'nce vuoi chiamare.                  | because you'll want to scream;
A passa dieci volte che salimo.         | After ten steps, we jump.
[Che de ser' e de matina...]

Chi la gagliarda donna vo imparare,     | If you want to learn the galliard
sotto lo mastro el bisognia stare       | You'll have to stay under the master.
[Che de ser' e de matina...]

A che e principiante li vo dare         | To the beginners I'll give
Questo compagnio ch'a nome Martino      | This companion, called Martino.
[Che de ser e de matina...]

The music score archive IMSLP has this to say about the text:

A fine mid-century villanella with ribald double-entendres.

I can see innuendo in two phrases: "ca 'nce vuoi chiamare" (apparently the lady screams because dancing lessons are so enjoyable) and "sotto lo mastro el bisognia stare" (obviously). Is there anything else? What am I missing?

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    Welcome to Italian.SE!
    – Denis Nardin
    May 16 '19 at 7:10
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    While I'm not sure about the interpretation of chiamare (I'd read it just as “call (the teachers)”, but I'm not an expert in 16th c. Neapolitan), I'd say that quite explicitly 'e principiante are the virgins (see la giovin principiante in Leporello's catalogue aria in Don Giovanni), and the companion to be “given” them is not too mysterious either.
    – DaG
    May 16 '19 at 9:39
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    I am no 16th century dialect expert, but I would note a few things: imparare is also used in the south as to teach, line in nessuno nasce imparato (no one is born with all the knowledge). Seen this way Chi la gagliarda donna vo' imparare might sound to those who want to teach the vigorous woman or if you want to tame the strong woman. ca 'nce vuoi chiamare. A passa dieci volte che salimo to me sounds like this: if you want to call us, stroll around ten times and we will come upstairs. In fact ca is not like modern Italian che. In dialect it might read since or if.
    – mico
    May 17 '19 at 7:19
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I am no 16th century dialect expert, but I would note a few things:

Imparare is also used in the south as to teach, as in the idiom nessuno nasce imparato (no one is born with all the knowledge).

Seen this way, Chi la gagliarda donna vo' imparare might sound to those who want to teach the vigorous woman or maybe even if you want to tame the strong woman.

The line ca 'nce vuoi chiamare. A passa dieci volte che salimo, to me sounds like this: if you want to call us, stroll around ten times and we will come upstairs.

In fact ca is (still) not like modern Italian che. In dialect it might read since, because or if.

Lastly, the companion called Martino, might hint to what is usually given to a woman skipping a formal introduction.

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