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Is "bella" considered as an adjective and "ciao" as a noun? OR "bella" is the addressee and "ciao" is an interjection meaning "goodbye".

Stated differently, is it translated as "beautiful goodbye/ beautiful farewell" OR "O beautiful, goodbye/ goodbye, beautiful"?

** This is the famous partisan song. I first heard it in La Casa de Papel.

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    Welcome to Italian.SE! – Charo May 18 '19 at 7:58
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    Can you explain more precisely in which context you found the expression? – Denis Nardin May 18 '19 at 8:03
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    @DenisNardin: Immagino si tratti della famosa canzone dei partigiani. – Charo May 18 '19 at 8:13
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    Yes, this is the famous partisan song. I first heard it in La Casa de Papel. – OS1799 May 18 '19 at 8:26
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    Should probably be written bella, ciao! since that's the meaning in the song. – Bakuriu May 18 '19 at 14:54
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The second one, definitely. Bye, beautiful.

I would translate A beautiful goodbye as Un bel saluto or Un bell'addio (masculine --- I'm not sure why, but in practice these kinds of salutations and interjections all get the masculine), and What a beautiful goodbye to Che bell'addio. All of these sound a bit awkward to my ear.

You can also say un bel ciao (again masculine --- as can be seen also in the recently popular meme ciaone), but I would take it to mean "a nice, friendly salutation with the word ciao". Note that ciao in Italian does not have the meaning of "farewell / final parting salutation" that goodbye has in English. If you wish to stress the fact that you won't see someone ever again, you use the more dramatic addio. So in the text of this song it's just a casual salutation.

As @DenisNardin points out in a comment (thanks!), the word ciao in Italian is a generic salutation used with the informal register (dare del tu), and is used indifferently both when meeting (like hello) and when parting (like bye). Given the context of the song I would choose to translate it to goodbye, but both meanings are possible.

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    You already alluded to it, but it might be worth specifying that ciao in Italian means both bye and hello, so un bel ciao could also mean a nice greeting. – Denis Nardin May 18 '19 at 9:36
  • “I'm not sure why, but in practice these kinds of salutations and interjections all get the masculine”: Just because. :) I'd say there is no precise “why”... Why is tavolo masculine and sedia feminine? (Yes, sometimes because Latin etc., but there is no real “because”.) And by the way, at the very least buonanotte and buonasera, as nouns, are feminine. – DaG May 18 '19 at 10:05
  • buonanotte and buonasera, as nouns, are feminine. Are they? Would you say "Mi salutò con un buonasera" or "Mi salutò con una buonasera"? The first one sounds correct to me, and Google seems to return more results for the first expression. – Federico Poloni May 18 '19 at 10:20
  • My ear (which of course is no authority, but I find un buonasera weird), Treccani, De Mauro and Zingarelli all agree on feminine for buonasera and buonanotte... – DaG May 18 '19 at 10:33
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    And, would you say “Ti ho chiamato per darti il buonanotte”? – DaG May 18 '19 at 10:34

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