2

What is the difference between using "alcuno" and "nessuno" in negative sentences? Are the sentences below correct? Is there a difference of meaning? Is one of them more usual?

  • Lui non mangia carne.
  • Lui non mangia alcuna carne.
  • Lui non mangia nessuna carne.
  • 1
    Carne is, in English terminology, a mass noun, so you can’t use alcuna or nessuna before it – egreg Aug 15 '19 at 20:01
  • 3
    @egreg Sei così sicuro? Non mangia nessuna carne: né manzo né maiale. – Denis Nardin Aug 15 '19 at 21:09
  • 2
    I would say all these sentences are correct, but "Non mangia alcuna carne" (which is equivalent to "Non mangia nessuna carne") is less used nowadays. The meaning is similar, but "Non mangia nessuna carne" carries a slightly different nuance: it stresses on the fact that there are different kinds of meat and the subject of the sentence doesn't eat any of them. – Charo Aug 16 '19 at 6:37
  • 1
    @DenisNardin non mangia carne, né manzo né maiale – egreg Aug 16 '19 at 9:13
  • @egreg: Sul Grande dizionario della lingua italiana si trova "carni bianche", "carni rosse", "carni nere", "carni affumicate"... – Charo Aug 17 '19 at 20:03
2

All these sentences are correct, but "Non mangia alcuna carne" (which is equivalent to "Non mangia nessuna carne") is less used nowadays, as you can see from this extract of a section talking about indefinite adjectives and pronouns from the book Grammatica dell'italiano adulto, by Vittorio Coletti:

      Nell'italiano antico alcuno poteva essere usato anche al singolare in frasi positive, ma oggi non è più ammesso, e la nostra lingua tende a comportarsi come il francese (dove aucun si trova solo in frasi negative) e a differire dallo spagnolo e dal portoghese che conservano il valore positivo di algún.
      Alcuno al singolare patisce la concorrenza di nessuno (come in spagnolo) e stenta quindi, diversamente che in francese, anche in questo ruolo («non c'è nessuna traccia» è molto più attestato su Google di «non c'è alcuna traccia»).

The meaning of your sentences is similar, but "Non mangia nessuna carne" (or "alcuna carne") carries a slightly different nuance: it stresses on the fact that there are different kinds of meat and the subject of the sentence doesn't eat any of them.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.