4

In "Young Pope" miniseries there is a scene where Tonino Pettola gets surprised in his house by a visit from the pope and his cardinals. Upon noticing them he asks:

"A cosa devo il motivo di questa visita?"

Is 'il motivo' really necessary in this sentence? Wouldn't it be enough to ask "A cosa devo questa visita?" This seemed a bit redundant to me and I was wondering if maybe this was just a way of characterizing this Tonino Pettola person?

Link to video for reference: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLPC43xlbzM

2
  • 3
    Yes, you can ask "A cosa devo questa visita?" or (with a slightly different nuance in meaning) "Qual è il motivo di questa visita?". You may also say "A cosa devo l'onore di questa visita?" or "A cosa devo il piacere di questa visita?". But "A cosa devo il motivo di questa visita?" sounds weird to me.
    – Charo
    Nov 1 '19 at 22:26
  • 2
    As @Charo says, it's supposed to mock the excessively corteous way in which Tonino Pettola, a poor shepherd, tries to welcome the unexpected arrival of the Pope himself with big hat and everything. He tries to speak in a formal manner, like one would speak to the Pope, but he doesn't really succeed (he's a shepherd, after all) and something weird and artificial comes out instead. Nov 8 '19 at 14:40
3

Yes, you can ask

A cosa devo questa visita?

or, with a slightly different nuance in meaning,

Qual è il motivo di questa visita?

You may also say

A cosa devo l'onore di questa visita?

or

A cosa devo il piacere di questa visita?

But the sentence "A cosa devo il motivo di questa visita?" doesn't make much sense from a logical point of view because it's not "il motivo" that is due to something, but the visit itself. I've never watched this series but, as said in @DaG's comment and suggested by you, it's quite possible that this absurdly pompous way of talking it's a resource to characterize the person that is saying this.

1

"A cosa devo il motivo di questa visita?"

and

"A cosa devo questa visita?"

Are pretty much equivalent; but in my opinion the first one has a more formal tone and emphasizes the concept that the speaker thinks that his interlocutor must have a strong motivation for the visit; maybe it can be also considered a way to politely solicit an explanation.

Thanks to @Charo's comment, I also add that

A cosa devo l'onore di questa visita

Would have been even more formal and deferential.

5
  • 1
    Veramente è così? "A cosa devo (l'onore di/il piacere di) questa visita?" penso significhi: 1) Questa visita (l'onore di questa visita/il piacere di questa visita) ha un motivo. 2) Mi chiedo quale sia questo motivo. 3) Sono in debito con questo motivo (nel senso che sono grato/a che questo motivo abbia dato luogo alla visita). Quindi, "A cosa devo il motivo di questa visita?", significherebbe: 1) Il motivo di questa visita ha un motivo, ecc. Sembra un po' strano, no?
    – Charo
    Nov 1 '19 at 23:55
  • @Charo "A cosa devo (l'onore di/il piacere di) questa visita?" indicano una certa deferenza; è corretta secondo me l'interpretazione "sono in debito con te per questa visita" (non penso si possa essere in debito con il motivo di una visita :) ). "A cosa devo il motivo di questa visita?" a mio giudizio sembra più formale. Nov 2 '19 at 0:28
  • 2
    Concordo con @Charo che da un punto di vista logico la frase non ha molto senso: non è il motivo che è dovuto a qualcosa, bensì la visita. Non conosco la serie di cui si parla, ma suppongo che, come ipotizza Tad, la battuta sia inutilmente ampollosa per caratterizzare un personaggio.
    – DaG
    Nov 2 '19 at 8:43
  • @RiccardoDeContardi: Era l'analisi della frase in modo letterale: "Devo la visita a qualcosa". Ovviamente questo "essere grato a questa cosa" ha un senso figurato.
    – Charo
    Nov 2 '19 at 9:01
  • Potresti scrivere una risposta, @DaG?
    – Charo
    Nov 2 '19 at 10:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.