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I realize this is not a question specifically about the Italian language, so I apologize if this is the wrong place to ask. I see many Italian dates written to include "n. xxxx" at the end. For example, 12 November 1818, n. 1379. What do the numbers after n. refer to?

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    On a side note, "n." before a date would usually mean "nato" (or "nata"), that is "born". Usually seen on tombstones.
    – Zab Zonk
    Jan 27 at 9:58
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It simply means numero (number) since it is commonly used when you have more than an occurrence of a certain event during the same day.

Think about, for example, an hospital registering newborn children.

Actually the “n.” and what follows is not actually part of the date. It might well appear before it, or somewhere else in the same document.

Also, on newspapers and magazines and periodic publications in general that "n. xxx", preceded or followed by a date, is the equivalent of "issue (nr.) xxx". In those cases, it is not unusual to see it followed by Roman numerals (e.g. "n. 12" or "n. XII")

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    Just to stress the gist of this correct answer: the “n.” and what follows is not actually part of the date. It might well appear before it, or somewhere else in the same document: think about the reference numbers for letters incoming or outgoing from an office, and so on.
    – DaG
    Jan 27 at 8:14
  • Also, on newspapers, magazines and periodic publications in general that "n. xxx", preceded or followed by a date, is the equivalent of "issue (nr.) xxx". In those cases, it is not unusual to see it followed by Roman numerals (e.g. "1 Gennaio 2021, n. 12" or "1 Gennaio 2021, n. XII")
    – secan
    Jan 27 at 8:33
  • I found your comments useful, hence I included them in my answer
    – abarisone
    Jan 27 at 8:36
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    I almost forgot: the format "[date], n. [number]" or "n. [number], [date]" is also a common way to refer to laws. So the second law ("legge") approved in 2019, on January 30th would be indicated with "legge n. 2, 30 Gennaio 2019" or "legge 30 Gennaio 2019, n. 2" or, in short, "legge 2/2019" (month and day are not particularly relevant because the law numbers are sequential, within the same year)
    – secan
    Jan 27 at 9:24

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