-1

I know this is an Italian phrase that means saddness yes but sh""t no? But I couldn't find its translation. What does cesse mean here?

5
  • 2
    Where did you find the phrase? And is profanity necessary?
    – egreg
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 9:47
  • Sorry didn't know it is a curse. I saw it on instagram when someone noted that though she is sad she will not wear any"cesse" closes.
    – LoveIsHere
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 10:29
  • 1
    I was referring to “sh*t”. But “cesse” means nothing in Italian.
    – egreg
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 10:30
  • She translated it to "sh*t" it was an italian teacher. that was why i did not find the translation maybe. Thnks
    – LoveIsHere
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 11:05
  • 1
    Is the phrase exactly “triste si cesse mai”? (Without inverted commas it's hard to parse your question.) Like this, it's not Italian.
    – DaG
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 15:10

1 Answer 1

1

The phrase is triste sì, cesse mai, it is not elegant, is a popular, vulgar term, but it is often used.

And in a dictionary there aren't only chic words.

Cesse is a corruption for cesso, forgive me the inelegance, but it is Italian: it is a vulgar term for toilet. It has also a figurative sense and means very ugly, if referred to a person.

https://www.treccani.it/vocabolario/cesso2/

Triste sì, cesse mai is the phrase of a person who says that, even if going through a hard time, will not neglect her/his appearance.

5
  • 1
    Mentioning scurrilous language if there is a reason for it is of course never a problem, as opposed to using it, and “cesso” is not even especially scurrilous, it's just one of several synonyms of “bagno”, “latrina” etc., apart from its figurative uses. That said, where do they say “cesse” for “cesso”?
    – DaG
    Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 16:48
  • Because it is a more popular, even if more vulgar, way of pronouncing 'cesso', more confidential, it can be used with friends or on a site as Instagram, to give more emphasis, more 'colour . As if one suddenly becomes to speak dialect, but this is not dialect, is a corruption of Italian. It is not in a dictionary, of course, but in spoken everyday language often there are such corruptions/modifications. Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 17:06
  • Anyway, I think that the person who wrote the phrase wanted say cess', truncated, I guess that this was the idea of pronounciation. Not 'cesse' pronouncing the final 'e'. Commented Jan 4, 2023 at 17:09
  • 1
    Thanks i heard ber pronounce cesse with the final e. This is exactly what she meant as you wrote in your answer.
    – LoveIsHere
    Commented Jan 5, 2023 at 13:40
  • You're welcome. These are personal variations without particular meaning or importance. Just are things that happen in spoken everyday language, of course it is not standard italian. Commented Jan 5, 2023 at 13:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.