3

There is a quote that as been at times translated with the word "rape".

It is attributed to the Prince

“I judge this indeed, that it is better to be impetuous than cautious, because fortune is a woman; and it is necessary, if one wants to hold her down, to beat her and strike her down. And one sees that she lets herself be won more by the impetuous than by those who proceed coldly. And so always, like a woman, she is the friend of the young, because they are less cautious, more ferocious, and command her with more audacity

What is the original quote in Italian, and can it be translated to "rape"?

6

It's the last period of Chapter XXV from "Il Principe":

«Io iudico bene questo, che sia meglio essere impetuoso che respettivo; perché la fortuna è donna, et è necessario, volendola tenere sotto, batterla et urtarla. E si vede che la si lascia più vincere da questi, che da quelli che freddamente procedano. E però sempre, come donna, è amica de’ giovani, perché sono meno respettivi, più feroci e con più audacia la comandano.»

The verbs Machiavelli is using are "battere" and "urtare", meaning "to beat" and "to hurt", the last IMO also in the sense of "not satisfying her requests". The general meaning is that you need to "subdue", "subjugate" fortune like you would with an animal or … a woman.

No, you cannot use the verb "to rape".

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    better answer than mau's for the translation of urtare. Just "reddamente" needs to become "freddamente" (I was unable to fix it, because an edit must be at least 6 characters) – Walter Tross Jun 29 '14 at 22:20
3

Wikiquote reports

La fortuna è donna: ed è necessario, volendola tenere sotto, batterla e urtarla. (cap. XXV)

and the original text, at least according to this source, is

Concludo, adunque, che, variando la fortuna, e stando li uomini ne' loro modi ostinati, sono felici mentre concordano insieme, e, come discordano, infelici. Io iudico bene questo, che sia meglio essere impetuoso che respettivo; perché la fortuna è donna, et è necessario, volendola tenere sotto, batterla et urtarla. E si vede che la si lascia più vincere da questi, che da quelli che freddamente procedano. E però sempre, come donna, è amica de' giovani, perché sono meno respettivi, più feroci e con più audacia la comandano.

As for your second question, I don't think "rape" is a good translation. "Battere", in this context, is to beat; maybe "urtare" could be "shove her, so that she stays at her place", or it could be a way to reinforce "battere". But no raping is involved.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy