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Upon searching for a figurative sense for addictive in Italian, I have not found an entry that is sufficient for describing the sense of being drawn to something so much that you want to do it often.

For example:

Social media is so addictive; I could stay on Facebook for days.

Wordreference.com fails to find a sufficient term for this:

addictive adj figurative (activity: habit-forming) traduzione non disponibile

A lot of people find yoga addictive after a month or so.

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The best translation derives from assuefare. Which means exactly what you want to say

describing the sense of being drawn to something so much that you want to do it often.

Translation of your examples using assuefare

I social media sono molto assuefacenti; posso stare su Facebook per giorni.

and

Molte persone trovano lo yoga assuefacente dopo un mese

and to confirm it, I found right now a reference to a dictionary Italian to English: assuefacente.

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The literal meaning can be given in Italian as che dà assuefazione (or the uncommon, and already recorded, assuefacente), but in the figurative uses one would rather use avvincente (having a not-too-distant literal meaning: “something that binds”), appassionante and the like.

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I think the above "avvincente" doesn't convey the exact meaning of "addicting" at all. In fact, "avvincente" means something that is exciting, absorbing or really interesting: "una storia avvincente".

"Assuefacente" sounds too complicated a word (even for Italian standards) for every-day speech.

I have two different translations for "addicting":

  • "Social media is so addictive; I could stay on Facebook for days" = "I social network sono una droga; potrei stare su Facebook per giorni". This is a very informal expression, that you can use with friends or family. It perfectly reflects the English meaning of "something addictive like a drug."

  • "A lot of people find yoga addictive after a month or so" = "In molte persone lo yoga crea dipendenza dopo un mese circa". This expression can be used in a formal context, but won't sound unnatural even if you use it with friends: it will just show that you have proper knowledge of the language!

    "Crea" is the verb "creare": io creo, tu crei, egli crea, noi creiamo, voi create, essi creano.

As for the expression "I'm addicted to....":

-"I'm addicted to you" = "Mi crei dipendenza" / "Sei la mia droga" (Watch out: don't say "Sono dipendente da te"/"dipendo da te" has a slightly different meaning: it means "I depend on you").

-"I'm addicted to yoga" can be translated with "Lo yoga è la mia droga", "Sono drogato di yoga" (both informal), "Non posso fare a meno dello yoga", "non posso vivere senza lo yoga".

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    È una droga” and “crea dipendenza” are certainly good translations for the uses of “addictive” (or “addicting”) closer to the literal meaning. When suggesting “avvincente” and the like, I had more in mind the very frequent use of “addictive”, say, in the blurb of a game, an app, a recreative activity. In Italian you wouldn't try to sell a game saying that it crea dipendenza, while in English all games are addictive (just like all action novels are compelling, love stories are heartbreaking and so on). – DaG Jan 18 '15 at 12:32

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