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How do you say "Good morning" in Italian? For instance, when I get up and go to my living room, I like to say "good morning" to my family members. I know that it is not "buon mattina". I'm not sure if it is "buon giorno" because it means "good day" and not "good morning". If you can say "buon giorno" in my case (my example) then please tell me the reason!!

  • 'goodmoring' is equivalent of 'buongiorno' and 'good day' is of 'buona giornata' which is different from 'buongiorno' – Elberich Schneider Jan 29 '15 at 1:40
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    "Buona giornata" is "have a good day". You would say it when you are leaving someone, just like in French you would say "bonjour" at the beginning and "bonne journée" at the end. If the times of the day are correct, obviously :) – laureapresa Feb 27 '15 at 15:27
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"Buona mattina" is not an used expression even if it's correct. "Buongiorno" is used both to to greet after wake up, than for the people you meet in the morning. For friends and family you can also use "buondì", it's more "carefree"

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    "dì" stands for "giorno", so "buondì" is the same as "buongiorno" – Mario Vernari Jan 29 '15 at 9:05
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    It's not just in the morning. While in the afternoon it's possible and correct to say "Buon pomeriggio", "buongiorno" is used at all times before sunset / 5pm according to regional habits. – Diego Martinoia Oct 7 '16 at 9:29
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    I usually use "buondì" especially in the morning (informal); "buongiorno" (generic/formal/until midday); "buonasera" (past midday/afternoon) – Riccardo De Contardi Jul 26 '17 at 14:24
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You don't say "buongiorno" in the afternoon or evening, so even it means "good day", it's used only in the morning. To express have a good day, you have to say "buona giornata"

Source: Some example about how to say have a good day in Italian

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My mother and father were from the north of Italy. The expression buona Mattina was what they said, and you say it is wrong! Why?

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    He did not say wrong! Just uncommon (for example, I've never used it by myself and I don't remember if I ever heard it - but it's not the kind of thing you remember), but perfectly correct and valid. – Riccardo De Contardi Jul 26 '17 at 14:27
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    I'd like to see even a single occurrence of such an unheard phrase in a book, film or the like. – DaG Jul 26 '17 at 15:29

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