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If I want to say someone "I am missing you", how it is translated in Italian?

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    Do you feel sad because they're gone, or are you failing to hit them with a thrown object? – Federico Poloni Jun 30 '15 at 8:57
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    Fine remark, @FedericoPoloni. One sense translates as Mi manchi, the other one as ti manco! – DaG Jun 30 '15 at 12:10
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    @FedericoPoloni ahaahahah for some reasons that cracked me up! :D – Ant Jul 1 '15 at 21:10
  • If you are satisfied with the answer to your question, please consider the option to "accept" it by clicking a checkmark next to the answer. – I.M. Oct 24 '15 at 9:14
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I'd say either, from which in my experience is the most used form to which in my experience is the least used form, "Mi manchi", "Sento la tua mancanza" or (hold on before using this one) "Mi stai mancando".

The first one is, in my experience, definetly the most widespread; it's in present tense, and it translates to English more or less literally as "I miss you".

The second one it's still in present tense, and it translates to English more or less literally as "I feel your absence".

The third one it's in gerund tense, and it translates to English more or less literally as "I'm missing you" (hence this is the form which matches the example the most); however, despite this being a perfectly correct form, it sounds a bit weird and I'd rather discourage its use in favour of each of the previously mentioned forms.


In the (I think pretty remote) case you're asking for how to say "I am missing you" in the case you're missing someone while throwing objects at them, then I'd say either "Ti sto mancando" or "Ti manco".

The first one it's in gerund tense, and it translates to English more or less literally as "I'm missing you";

The second one it's in present tense, and it translates to English more or less literally as "I miss you"; however again, despite this being a perfectly correct form, it sounds a bit weird (I think even more than "Mi stai mancando" in the other meaning of "I am missing you"), so again, I'd discourage its use in favour of the "Ti sto mancando" form.

On a side note: as addressed by Riccardo I. in the comments, "Ti manco" might be used also to tell someone we're missing them while trying to catch up with them, although while this is a perfectly correct form, it's also definetly not the most common form of saying this.

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    You could use "Ti manco" pretty much only in the case of "Ti manco ogni volta che torno in città" when you keep missing someone for a reunion or a meeting (not planned). I don't think there would be any other use of it, though – Riccardo I. Jul 20 '15 at 8:42
  • @RiccardoI. I guess that's a pretty dialectal acceptation, just judging from your [user]name you are from Tuscany, which I am from also, and I agree that here such a way of saying to that we couldn't catch up with him would be fine; I don't know about other regions tough. – kos Jul 20 '15 at 8:51
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    I'm from Torino, with parents from the south of Italy. We use it pretty much colloquially "Ci manchiamo di continuo" as in "Non riusciamo mai a vederci". But indeed is not a commonly used form, for sure. – Riccardo I. Jul 20 '15 at 8:53
  • @RiccardoI. Good enough to be added to the post then, since it's not as localized as I tought. Thanks – kos Jul 20 '15 at 9:02
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If the sense is like I miss you so I can't live without you the suitable translation is mi manchi.

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    Non è utilissimo dare una nuova risposta in cui ci si limita a ripetere parte di ciò che viene già detto, in modo più circostanziato, in un'altra risposta. – DaG Sep 29 '17 at 10:37

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