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I have difficulty understanding the meaning of the expression "in occasione di" in this sentence.

This text is about Big Ben.

Tradizionalmente il nome viene riferito, per estensione, anche all'orologio e all'intera torre dell'orologio, alta 96,30m e costruita in stile neogotico. Il nome ufficiale di quest'ultima è pero diventato Elizabeth Tower a fine giugno 2012, in occasione del giubileo di diamante della regina Elisabetta.

Does the expression "in occasione di" in this sentence mean "due to" or "because of"?

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    I'd say: to commemorate the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elisabeth. – user519 Dec 22 '15 at 19:36
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    'on the occasion of' is perfect there, while 'due to' absolutely doesn't render the correct meaning of 'in occasione di' in that context. – Elberich Schneider Dec 22 '15 at 20:53
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it actually about English language. – DaG Dec 22 '15 at 22:46
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    I agree with DaG that the question as is phrased is off-topic; you should probably remove the translation part and ask for a comparison with e.g. "a causa di" or other terms equivalent to "due to" and "because of" that you already know of, in order to make the question on-topic and for you to have a useful answer at the same time. A translation coming with an answer, if any, will be a bonus. – kos Dec 22 '15 at 23:12
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    I agree: you should reformulate the question; otherwise, it will be closed. – Charo Dec 23 '15 at 8:12
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Il nome ufficiale di quest'ultima è pero diventato Elizabeth Tower a fine giugno 2012, in occasione del giubileo di diamante della regina Elisabetta.

"Due to" and "because of" roughly mean "a causa di", and "a causa di" expresses a causality link;

"In occasione del" itself doesn't really imply a causality link, it implies that both events happened at the same time, although it also strongly suggests that two events were a good fit one for each other.

Take vacations as an example: you may well say that "In occasione delle vacanze sei andato a trovare dei parenti", but you'd probably never say that "A causa delle vacanze sei andato a trovare dei parenti".

So no, it doesn't mean exactly the same as "due to" or "because of".


If you're reasonably sure that the two events are causally linked, then you may well use "a causa di" in place of "in occasione del" (and hence also "because of" / "due to" e.g. in a translation), but mind that this implies a loss in the meaning, since the temporality link between the two events is lost; in a translation you're better off using (as suggested in the comments by Elberich Schneider and egreg) the English equivalent "on the occasion of".

If you want to just convey that the two events happened at the same time, hardening the sense of causality disjunction, you can use another adverb altoghether (such as "durante" / "during").

So if you're reasonably sure that the two events are causally linked, then you may well use "a causa di" in place of "in occasione del" (and hence also "because of" / "due to" e.g. in a translation), but again, the temporality link between the two events is lost:

The official name of the latter however became Elizabeth Tower at the end of june 2012, because of / due to Queen Elizabeth's diamond Jubilee.

If you don't want to lose the temporality link between the two events, in a translation you're better off using the English equivalent "on the occasion of":

The official name of the latter however became Elizabeth Tower at the end of june 2012, on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth's diamond Jubilee.

If you want to just convey that the two events happened at the same time, hardening the sense of causality disjunction, you can use another adverb altoghether (such as "durante" / "during"):

The official name of the latter however became Elizabeth Tower at the end of june 2012, during Queen Elizabeth's diamond Jubilee.

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