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My daughter, aged 14, is learning Italian. I'm thinking about subscribing to some Italian magazine for teenage girls. Which one would you recommend?

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    I'd suggest to get something based on her interests rather than strictly looking at the age or language proficiency itself. It might maintain and push her motivation in learning more. If I look at my family the teens wouldn't be caught dead reading Topolino but they are perfectly OK with mangas or other comics. – Erik vanDoren Mar 6 '16 at 2:47
  • Welcome to Italian.SE, @phs! – Charo Mar 6 '16 at 8:03
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Based on the size of their sales, I have three weekly magazines to suggest:

  1. Topolino (http://topolino.it/) is the most popular Italian magazine for the youth. Besides the Disney cartoons, it features articles of general interest for children and teenagers. Despite the fact that the publisher is a US based corporation, the content is originally developed and tailored specifically for Italian young readers. It might be easier to read for a beginner.

  2. Il Giornalino (http://ilgiornalino.g-web.it/) is the magazine for the youth published by Edizioni Paoline (known in the US as the "Pauline Books and Media"). It is targeted for an audience slightly older than Topolino.

  3. "Cioè" (http://www.cioe.it/) - published by Panini. Unlike the previous two, this is a publication specifically for teenage girls, with a "gossip" magazine format.

I wanted to give you more than one choice since only you, the parent, can evaluate how proficient is your daughter with the Italian language and what type of content you think is appropriate for her.

Buona lettura!

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    I think these might be too hard for a teenage girl who's learning Italian, and I think that an Italian equivalent of Speak up, if it exists at all, may be more appropriate, but as you say it's up the parents to judge the level – Denis Nardin Mar 6 '16 at 2:26
  • Welcome to Italian.SE, @rgulia! – Charo Mar 6 '16 at 8:05
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    Just to mention that Il Giornalino's publisher, Edizioni San Paolo, is strongly inspired to Catholic faith (which could a plus or a minus, depending) and belongs to the religious order Society of Saint Paul. – DaG Mar 6 '16 at 10:24
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    @DenisNardin: Even if she can't now understand everything in the magazine, it can be a motivation to learn if she finds it really interesting. I can assure this works for me whenever I try to learn a foreign language. – Charo Mar 6 '16 at 10:25
  • @Charo, I see that you have edited my post adding the link to Cioè. Thank you for that. As a new member I discovered that I could not post three links, so I had to drop one. – rgulia Mar 6 '16 at 22:18

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