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"Lead time" in manufacturing means the time between the start of a project and appearance of the results. Is the word "tempistica" an equivalent to this?

  • I'd say no: tempistica refers to any scheduled time. – egreg Apr 4 '17 at 6:58
  • What would you suggest? – FabioSpaghetti Apr 4 '17 at 6:58
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    When speaking of something that has to be delivered, such as the final project documentation, I might say "tempo di consegna". If instead we are referring to the total duration of the project, it could be "durata del progetto". – CasaMich Apr 4 '17 at 7:20
  • See also here: it.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead_time – user519 Apr 4 '17 at 9:06
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There are different suggestions for the translation of lead time. Probably the more general one is:

  • Tempo di esecuzione

But the Garzanti Dictionary, for instance, gives different suggestions according to context. You are probably referring to the third case:

  • 1 durata del ciclo di ricostituzione di una scorta

  • 2 durata del ciclo di alimentazione al reparto montaggio

  • 3 periodo intercorrente tra l'avvio e il completamento di un processo produttivo.

Tempistica, may convey the same meaning but you need to be specific:.

  • studio e programmazione dei tempi entro i quali deve svolgersi un'attività; anche, tempo necessario per compiere una determinata attività.
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In technical papers and with people working in project management, supply chain management you can use the English term and all will get the meaning as it's the term currently used. If you're writing to general public:

  • tempo morto (lead time that are 'pure waits'), like the lead time for a external purchase delivery
  • tempo di processo (the time the next process phase has to wait to begin as items are not yet ready).
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