2

proprio sotto al mio naso

{vs}: sotto un albero

I wonder why you need to use the two consecutive prepositions, "sotto" and "a", in the first example, even though its meaning does not seem any different from that in the second example.

When is the combination of "sotto" and "a" required?

4
  • 3
    I believe the preposition is optional in both cases.
    – egreg
    May 31 '18 at 7:21
  • 1
    I agree with egreg. Where did you find that you “need” to use that? And the whole phrase sounds slightly awkward: I'd say something like “[ce l'ho] proprio sotto il naso”, with no possessive adjective.
    – DaG
    May 31 '18 at 10:37
  • 1
    From Treccani dictionary: «Con funzione prepositiva, sono frequenti le locuz. sotto di, usata spec. con i pron. personali tonici (s. di me, s. di voi), e sotto a, che, meno com. con la forma tonica dei pron. personali (s. a te, s. a loro), è invece frequente con sostantivi (s. al letto, s. al pavimento, che si alternano con s. il letto, s. il pavimento).»
    – Charo
    May 31 '18 at 12:16
  • Qualcuno potrebbe prendere la spiegazione del Treccani come spunto per scrivere una risposta?
    – Charo
    May 31 '18 at 18:01
3

As explained in the Treccani dictionary, the preposition sotto (actually an adverb that can be used as preposition) can be followed by

  1. nothing,
  2. di, or
  3. a

before the main term. There is no difference in meaning. However, di is mostly used if the main term is a personal pronoun

sotto di me, sotto di loro

and rarely used in other cases. The choice between nothing and a has no real rule when the use is not figurative. Thus

sotto il moggio
sotto al moggio

and

me l'hanno fatta proprio sotto il naso
me l'hanno fatta proprio sotto al naso

are essentially equivalent.1 When the usage is figurative, nothing seems compulsory:

sotto l’alto patronato del presidente della Repubblica
combatterono sotto Cesare
patì sotto Ponzio Pilato

In these cases, sotto a would not be used. The description in the dictionary

3. Con funzione prepositiva, sono frequenti le locuzioni sotto di, usata specialmente con i pronomi personali tonici (sotto di me, sotto di voi), e sotto a, che, meno comunemente con la forma tonica dei pronomi personali (sotto a te, sotto a loro), è invece frequente con sostantivi (sotto al letto, sotto al pavimento, che si alternano con sotto il letto, sotto il pavimento).

is quite clear. If you look at the examples following the description, you actually never find sotto a.

Thus you are always right if you omit a, except in the case of a personal pronoun following sotto, where di should be preferred.

1 The possessive in proprio sotto al mio naso seems an Anglicism; in Italian the possessive is much less used than in English and in this case it is inappropriate.

1
  • When "proprio sotto al tuo naso" is meant as an equivalent of the figurative English expression "right under your nose", do you personally include the preposition "a"? Jun 1 '18 at 21:53

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.