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I thought the participle doesn't agree with object when the auxiliary verb is 'avere'. But while watching the film "13dici a tavola" (2004), I am coming across examples like:

  • (18:40) The housekeeper says: "Mi scusi, l'avevo riconosciuta, ma ero nell'orto."
  • (22:48) Matilde says: "Cos'è, l'ho detta troppo grossa?"

Is this colloquialism or peculiarity of the Tuscan dialect?

  • The reason is the presence of the pronoun "la". – Charo Sep 23 '18 at 18:00
  • Sorry for the closure, but it is pretty much an exact duplicate – Denis Nardin Sep 23 '18 at 23:14
  • I've added an answer to the other question. – Charo Sep 24 '18 at 9:53
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I thought the participle doesn't agree with object when the auxiliary verb is 'avere'.

This only applies when the direct object isn’t a clitic pronoun attached to the auxiliary. I have made a flowchart that explains the process:

enter image description here

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    Your flowchart is interesting, but I'm not sure if, in your examples, "ne" can be called "adverb". Maybe it would be better to call it "pronominal particle". – Charo Sep 23 '18 at 19:21
  • Anyway, the final sentence of your chart maybe should be something like "In modern Italian, past participle usually remains uninflected" because of this kind of issues. – Charo Sep 23 '18 at 22:04
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    This flowchart looks unnecessarily complex: it inspires awe rather than clarifying a matter that can be explained with a couple of sentences (and I'm a mathematician, I love flowcharts per se). – DaG Sep 23 '18 at 22:36
  • @DaG: If you have suggestions on how to simplify the chart, feel free to tell me. – Tom S. Fox Sep 24 '18 at 2:15
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    Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. – Denis Nardin Sep 24 '18 at 7:15