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19

Prima di tutto, non sono gli autori a decidere, ma le norme redazionali della casa editrice (la più famosa a usare gli accenti acuti su “i” e “u” è l'Einaudi), come per quali virgolette («» o “”) usare, come impostare i dialoghi (virgolette, trattini etc.) e altre minuzie tra il tipografico e lo stilistico. In secondo luogo, il motivo per cui alcuni ...


19

There's more than one reason for that. The structure of the Italian keyboard I believe that the major reason has to be researched in the Italian keyboard: indeed, the key for è and é is the same. If it is pressed without any other keys, it outputs "è", while if it's used in combination with "Maiusc", it outputs "é". My guess is ...


15

Using the Italian keyboard layout on Linux (at least on Ubuntu 14.04), you can get the uppercase versions by engaging caps lock. For example, to type É, I turn on caps lock and press shift-è. I'm not sure whether this works on Windows and Mac, though. In practice, I've noticed that Italians will often append an apostrophe in place of a grave accent when the ...


13

L'accento grafico italiano deriva da un apostrofo che indicava la caduta di una sillaba. In Dante si trovano sia virtute sia virtù. Ovviamente le esigenze metriche spiegano l'uso delle due varianti, ma è evidente che ai suoi tempi la sillaba finale non era ancora definitivamente caduta. Il pennacchio si spostò sulla vocale, probabilmente per distinguere i ...


13

No. È un suono onomatopeico (https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onomatopea). "Bump" anche nei fumetti indica di solito una collisione, o meglio il suono emesso a seguito di una caduta o un tonfo. In questo caso viene utilizzato credo in modo sarcastico per indicare che la giornalista è piombata all'improvviso alle sue conclusioni come un avvoltoio. Sim. "...


11

This question is not simple to answer to. Indeed this term is the short form of "va bene" (that's ok), and is rarely used in written texts. But if you really want to write it, I would choose among three different forms: vabbè which is how you pronounce it vabbe' which is the linguistical correct form, with the truncation of "ne" vabbeh which correctly ...


10

No, in general, even when there are different meanings, words are written without accents. In these cases, context is the only way to desume the word meaning. For a few words the accent is mandatory to give them a specific meaning: for instance, dà used as verb (verb dare, = to give), even when the meaning is clear from the context. Da could also be a ...


9

I have never heard about such a rule. The pronoun sé wants the acute accent, because the vowel is closed. Of course, one can find sè in old books, because the distinction between acute and grave accent on e became widely used only during the second half of the twentieth century. There is no acute accent in the 1830 edition of a famous novel One can clearly ...


8

On the PC, special Italian characters, many of which are not present on Italian keyboards, can be inserted using the following ALT codes. To use these, first ensure that the Num Lock key has been pressed once so that it has become enabled (this key is also known as the BI Num key on Italian keyboards); usually a green LED above the keyboard will light up ...


8

Historical note. Until about the '50s (I do not have a precise date) in Italian books some accents were written "the other way around", i.e. using the grave accents where one would use the acute one today and the other way around. "Perché" was one of these words. For example, have a look at the following page of this novel from 1902, third paragraph: […] ...


8

Il Dizionario d'ortografia e di pronunzia è utilissimo per questo tipo di dubbi. In particolare, conferma la pronuncia con l'accento tonico sulla “o” (e la “o” aperta) per Tremosine. Purtroppo il DOP non usa l'IPA come alfabeto fonetico: quella specie di “s” allungata denota la s “dolce” (cioè sonora). Infine, non sempre l'assenza di accento grafico, anche ...


7

Come qualcuno ha giustamente notato, in italiano la "i" e "u" hanno solo suono chiuso quindi l'accento corretto sarebbe quello acuto; gli accenti sono stati "semplificati" prima dai tipografi (al tempo del piombo) e poi definitivamente standardizzati dalle macchine per scrivere, che hanno normalizzato l'accento grave anche dove non c'entrava nulla. C'è stata ...


7

The phonetic system of standard Italian has seven vowels: a (in IPA, /a/), closed e (/e/), open e (/ɛ/), i (/i/), closed o (/o/), open o (/ɔ/), u (/u/). The accent is usually only written to denote the main stress on a word when it is on the last syllable, so you cannot normally graphically distinguish between botte meaning “barrel” (and pronounced /'bot:e/)...


6

Everything has been said already, however you ask when you should use ò vs. ó vs o (and, I guess, similarly for è vs. é etc.). In the case of "o" it's relatively easy: the only case where an accent needs to be written is if it's on the last letter of a word (with exceptions for monosyllables and a few other cases which however we won't go into here)...


5

Windows: I guess there's only one way to do it (corrections are welcome): ALT+Numerical keyboard combination. For example È is ALT+0200. Since the moment there are very few cases that requires diactritics uppercase and È is the most common, learning the combination will do the job easily even if most people will write: "E'". Programs like Word should correct ...


5

In italiano si pronuncia Ébola Èbola. In altre lingue, come in inglese, ebòla.


5

I don't know of any pair where the final acute or grave accent distinguishes the words and would bet there aren't any. There are only minimal pairs of words where the accent is not marked: pésca (fishing) and pèsca (peach) is the classical example, but both are simply written pesca. The question why two forms of the graphic accents are used (acuto and grave)...


4

Off the top of my head, hoping in further contributions: e meaning “and”; è meaning “(he/she/it) is”; e' ancient (also used in modern Tuscan), truncated form for ei, that is, egli (“he”) or essi ("they"). As this word is a proclitic word, it is pronounced together with the following word which is the one that is stressed. Another archaic and modern Tuscan ...


4

I don't know "trichotomous" or "quadrichotomous" words other than the ones mentioned in the question and by @DaG, but there are plenty "dicotomous" words, whose third form represents a common error: Fa => musical note, third person of the present indicative of "fare" (to do) / fa' => imperative of fare, second person singular; Sta => third person singular ...


4

Di: preposition, "of", "from" and others. Il libro di Marco. Dì: substantive, a bit antiquated/literary but still used here and there, "day". La sera del dì di festa. Di': imperative of "dire". Di' la verità. Edit: perhaps also: Ne: adverb, pronoun (does not have an english counterpart). Non ne sapevo nulla. Né: conjunction, "neither/nor". Né l'uno né l'...


4

The only occurrence I could find of a spelling similar to cafeé in an Italian text is caveè, in a report by 16th-century cardinal and ambassador Gianfrancesco Morosini, as quoted in Le relazioni degli ambasciatori veneti al Senato raccolte, annotate ed edite da Eugenio Alberi (1855). Speaking about Turks after his mission in Constantinople, he wrote in 1585: ...


4

Non c'è dubbio che l'accento ci va. Nel glossario finale dell'Italiano di Serianni si legge: La regola per la quale l'accento tonico va segnato su tutte le parole polisillabiche (cioè di due o più sillabe) accentate sull'ultima non ammette eccezioni: quindi ventitré, trentatré ecc. e anche nontiscordardimé e viceré. All'interno del testo c'è anche un ...


4

Come puoi vedere nel punto 1 della voce "sì" del vocabolario Treccani, in italiano esiste un avverbio "sì", scritto con l'accento, di uso arcaico e letterario equivalente a "così". Tuttavia, questo dizionario spiega che l'utilizzo di questo vocabolo con valore consecutivo è oggi ancora vivo in alcune espressioni che possono essere considerate praticamente ...


3

When using Linux you may use Compose Keys and map the right control, for example, to be the Compose key. This can be done under Keyboard/Keymapping settings tool of your Desktop Manager. Then you'll be able to use several default mappings as well as create your own set of key mapping. I was not able to use Compose Keys on OS/X although they work well on ...


3

Maybe I'm missing the point here, but if you set your language to US International, and I assume various others, this is easy. Apostrophe (') then shift-E produces É. Backquote (`) then shift-E produces È. Various other combinations are available. I don't know about using the Italian language profile itself.


3

Wikipedia says When using Microsoft Windows, the standard Italian keyboard layout does not allow one to write 100% correct Italian language, since it lacks capital accented vowels, and in particular the È key. The common workaround is writing E' (E followed by an apostrophe) instead, or relying on the auto-correction feature of several word ...


3

In my experience, I have found that many people simply resort to E' for È/É, A' for À, and so on. However, there are also some OS-specific tricks: Windows: there is no easy way. Some may employ Alt combinations (just like Alt+125 prints }, there are Alt combinations for uppercase accented letters), some may use charmap, some may use word processors which ...


3

Nell'italiano standard contemporaneo l'accento circonflesso è pressoché scomparso, usato in certi testi che tengono molto all'ortografia classica (come appunto il dizionario Treccani) e altrove al massimo per risolvere certe ambiguità, come il già citato principi/principî, assassini/assassinî (plurali di assassino e di assassinio), geni/genî (plurali di gene ...


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