10 votes
Accepted

How do I say "In another news" so it would make sense to a native speaker in an email?

Unfortunately Entre altre notizie has no meaning in Italian. If you mean In other news you could translate it with cambiando argomento or passando ad altro. The expression cari colleghi is fine at ...
abarisone's user avatar
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9 votes

Signing a card or letter using "famiglia"

If you mean a literal “&”, none of the proposed forms is meaningful. In an informal communication, you'd use the first name followed, if necessary, by e famiglia. For instance: (Saluti da) ...
DaG's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Why always "Lei" instead of "lui" in formal speech, irrespective of addressee's sex?

According to La Grammatica Italiana, by the Istituto Treccani Until the fourteenth century the system of allocutive pronouns was composed only by tu and voi as a form of respect. The first ...
Denis Nardin's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

Which pronoun for formal second person plural?

Short answer: it's really uncommon to use loro in this case. You may want to use voi even in a formal conversation. Why? I don't really know. Perhaps, because voi was used in the past for the plurale ...
maxadamo's user avatar
  • 300
5 votes
Accepted

Informal response from a high level restaurant

I don't like this style either, but it seems to be more and more widespread. In fact many of my friends and acquaintances react very badly when addressed with the lei form in such a setting, usually ...
Denis Nardin's user avatar
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5 votes

Why always "Lei" instead of "lui" in formal speech, irrespective of addressee's sex?

§9.6 of Maiden's A Linguistic History of Italian: Pronouns of address The CL second person pronouns distinguished singular (TU) and plural (UOS). This system is continued in many southern ...
Geremia's user avatar
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4 votes

If “credevo che vi importava di più della vostra amica che di" were to be rewritten in a formal register, should the subjunctive be used (importasse)?

Yes, the correct (meaning “standard in modern Italian”) form of this sentence would be the one with the subjunctive mood, as is usual with verbs expressing an opinion, a belief etc. For instance, ...
DaG's user avatar
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4 votes

Difference between "darsi del tu" and "del lei"

None of the previous answers have addressed the origin of the forms "tu", "voi" and "lei", an aspect also asked by the OP and, for this reason, I would like to add some words. According to Luca ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
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Linguaggio formale ed informale

Purtroppo il linguaggio non si divide in caselline ben separate ed etichettate. Non è possibile distinguere tutte le espressioni come "formali" o "informali": alcune sono sicuramente formali (e.g. ...
Denis Nardin's user avatar
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4 votes

How to say the phrase in text in a formal way

I think that a good one can be Gradirei sentire la sua opinione in merito all'offerta che le abbiamo fatto la scorsa settimana I suggest you to don't use "ciao" since as translation of "hello" ...
gvgramazio's user avatar
4 votes

Lei è or lei sei when talking to someone in formal way

When addressing someone formally with "lei", you must conjugate the verb in third person singular. In the chapter "Il verbo [1]" of the book Grammatica e pratica della lingua ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Tienimi, tenetemi, tengami

Almost. The usual form is Mi tenga informato. or (just using a different verb): Mi mantenga informato. That is, when using the formal addressing imperative, the pronoun goes before the verb as a ...
persson's user avatar
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3 votes

Singular or plural past participle with formal "vi"?

Section 7.1.6 of the book Grammatica italiana. Con nozioni di linguistica by Maurizio Dardano and Pietro Trifone (third edition) is devoted to Italian allocutive pronouns, beginning with the so called ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 38.8k
3 votes
Accepted

Usage of third person plural as a courtesy form

The common respect form is “lei” for a single person and the verb in the third person singular. It used to be “loro” for more people and the verb in the third person plural, but in current Italian it'...
egreg's user avatar
  • 18k
3 votes

Are these farewells formal?

The forms of salutations you cite are very common and colloquial. They are typically used with friends and people you are familiar with. They are similar to the more internationally known forms ...
Hachi's user avatar
  • 1,239
2 votes
Accepted

Consigli per una mail formale

Come hai scritto va benissimo, comunque, se vuoi scrivere una lettera in stile burocratico, adotta questo tenore: Al Responsabile dell'Ufficio Immigrazione ...
antonio's user avatar
  • 210
2 votes

Thank you card Salutation to an Italian priest

According to this page a formal salutation could be Reverendo Padre Rossi while Egregio Padre is slightly less formal. Also according to the same page, the letter should end with a phrase ...
Riccardo De Contardi's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

C'è ‘voseo’ in italiano?

Scusatemi ma non posso postare commenti, solo risposte. A me sembra che l'OP, avendo trovato menzionata in un film la differenza tra "voi" e "Lei" si chiedesse se in italiano il &...
Sbaracchino's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Perché non sento il verbo "ribadire" nelle conversazioni informali?

Il Grande dizionario italiano dell’uso di Tullio De Mauro fa la distinzione, nella sua sezione "Marca d'uso", tra queste e altre categorie: FO: fondamentale; tra i lemmi principali, sono così ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 38.8k
1 vote
Accepted

Proper form of addressing ecclesiastics in writing?

You can find on Treccani's appellativi e epiteti [prontuario] a list of proper forms for most of ecclesiastics and their abbravistions. For a bishop: (Sua) Eccellenza (S. Ecc. o Sua Ecc.): ...
abarisone's user avatar
  • 20.3k
1 vote

Which pronoun for formal second person plural?

In modern Italian language "voi" means you (plural). The pronoun "loro" means they and is used even as honorific plural form. However in northern Italy old people used "voi" as honorific form when ...
palindromo's user avatar

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