Hot answers tagged

11

There are several problems with the sentence. First of all, the verb sperare needs a di in front of another verb. Second, with countries one uses in not a. More to the point of the question, the usage of dates is wrong: one needs to use the article in front of the day, not the month. Moreover the di in front of the month is optional, and sounds very strange ...


7

o / oppure They are basically interchangeable. "Oppure" can carry a slightly stronger value, highlighting an option that excludes all others: "non so se verrà nel mattino o nel pomeriggio, oppure se non verrà affatto" ("I do not know whether he/she will come in the morning or in the afternoon or if he/she will not come at all"). ...


6

The correct way of reading the words is poi c'hai pietà del nostro mal is poi che hai pietà del nostro mal. In modern Italian, the first two words are more often written as a single one, poiché, meaning “since, due to”. Hence, the clause means simply something like “...since you have mercy on our wicked suffering” (not an actual nice translation, since ...


5

"Voglia" in "avere voglia" is a noun, not a verb in the congiuntivo. "Avere voglia (di fare qc)" can be literally translated as "To have the desire (to do sth.)". The difference to "volere" is similar to the difference between "I feel like dancing" and "I want to dance" (volere) I hope a ...


5

In your example there isn't a dependent clause with multiple verbs, but a dependent clause having another dependent clause, the latter needing the indicative mood. We say: C'è qualcosa che non va, not *c'è qualcosa che non vada so, Penso che ci sia qualcosa che non va or pensavo ci fosse qualcosa che non andava. More generally, if there are multiple verbs ...


5

Converto in risposta un precedente commento. Entrambe le forme sono corrette: cambia solo la sfumatura che si vuole dare. Come viene spiegato qui con esempi più approfonditi e, soprattutto, maggiore autorevolezza, “l’opinione più corretta è che la scelta di indicativo e congiuntivo nelle frasi interrogative indirette (...) non obbedisca a una sola regola, ma ...


5

You are right to note that in contemporary Italian only il can be used before a consonant, and the ending of the preceding word is irrelevant. However the rules regarding the usage of il vs lo have changed in the intervening centuries. From Rohlfs Grammatica storica della lingua italiana e dei suoi dialetti, paragraph 414 (my translation) In ancient times ...


5

It's a typo, no doubt. It should be Non sono esseri umani, ma bestie che..., that is, “Those are not human beings, but beasts, who...”. As for other examples in the web, you are free to ask about them, but keep in mind that, given any possible typo, Google will find it thousands of times.


4

Yes, also in Italian it's mandatory to capitalize the first letter of each sentence, as you can see in this article from Treccani encyclopedia: L'uso delle maiuscole è obbligatorio in una serie di casi. • All’inizio di testo o di una sua parte (capitolo, paragrafo ecc.) Quel ramo del lago di Como che volge a mezzogiorno (A. Manzoni, I promessi sposi) • ...


4

La prima e la terza delle espressioni che hai indicato hanno un significato diverso da quello che, credo, tu voglia dire: "Quanto ci mette a postare il video?" È una domanda che ci si fa quando qualcuno deve postare un video ed è in ritardo. Il senso di questa frase è: "Come mai ci mette così tanto a postare il video?" "Quanto ci ...


4

The Italian sentence might be Non era un legno di lusso, ma un semplice pezzo da catasta; uno di quelli che […] However in this context the pronoun can be safely omitted and the sentence flows better with the simple partitive.


4

I don't think it has a name per se: it's an assemblage of building blocks of Italian language. You could well use cui together with other prepositions (l'uomo al cui cospetto tremano tutti or la casa sul cui tetto c'è un'antenna), for instance. In itself, this “double genitive” is not logically different from using two specifications, with nouns (il nome del ...


4

You can find the answer to this question in the chapter 8 of the book Manuale di linguistica e filologia romanza by Lorenzo Renzi e Alvise Andreose (Il Mulino, Bologna, 2015): Il passaggio dal latino alle lingue romanze ha portato alla perdita di uno dei tre generi del latino, che accanto al maschile e al femminile possedeva anche un genere neutro. Ora il ...


3

Section 7.1.6 of the book Grammatica italiana. Con nozioni di linguistica by Maurizio Dardano and Pietro Trifone (third edition) is devoted to Italian allocutive pronouns, beginning with the so called "pronomi allocutivi di rispetto o di cortesia", namely "lei" ("ella" in classical literary texts) and "voi" for ...


3

The second version sounds quite unnatural. It's understandable, but verges on the ungrammatical. Even if you want to stress that it's Mario and Giovanni that are the focus of your sentence, you'd say something like: Mario e Giovanni quali espressioni usano? which isn't the finest of constructions, but is very acceptable colloquially to stress that you are ...


3

"Se ne è bevuto poco" è quello che direbbe e scriverebbe qualunque italiano. "Ne si" sarà una forma arcaica o una licenza poetica in azione.


3

Riassunto: In lo penso si usa il verbo pensare transitivo e lo ha la funzione di complemento oggetto. In ci penso si usa il verbo pensare intransitivo e ci ha la funzione di complemento locativo ("indica il luogo, reale o metaforico, verso cui è rivolto il pensiero"). Pensare non regge un complemento di termine: per questa ragione i pronomi gli o ...


3

It's not a matter of masculine vs feminine. The truncated form l' of the definite article can be used only for words starting with vowel. Therefore l'uomo is correct but l'donna is not. One point that might be the cause of the confusion is that the sound /w/ (as well as the sound /j/ in words like ieri) at the beginning of a word is considered a vowel in ...


3

Effettivamente, come si spiega nel libro Nuovo Contatto C1. Corso di lingua e civiltà italiana per stranieri (Loescher Editore, Torino) di R. Bozzone Costa, M. Piantoni, E. Scaramelli e C. Ghezzi, la particella pronominale ci si trova come particella fissa in alcune espressioni idiomatiche quali       volerci/metterci = occorrere: Da qui a casa mia ci ...


2

Le forme seguenti si usano comunemente, sia nella forma scritta che parlata e le reputo corrette: non mi riesce di farlo non riesco a farlo Le altre forme citate nella domanda non le ho mai sentite né lette prima. Immagino che siano sbagliate ma anche in questo caso, mi baso sull'esperienza e non ho una regola da citare: non mi riesce farlo non mi riesce ...


2

The meaning here of the participio presente is exactly the one you rephrase as “which corresponds to”. The participio passato is either used for the composite forms of the verbs (le risposte non hanno corrisposto alle domande) or is used as an adjective denoting something that has done or received the action of the verb. Corrisposto would refer to something ...


2

You can find a detailed answer to this question in the article by Vittorio Coletti "Articolo determinativo con nomi di aziende", published in the website of the Accademia della Crusca: Nessuna regola della lingua vieta di dire “Fiat ha venduto le sue azioni” o “La Fiat ha venduto le sue azioni”, anche se la seconda soluzione è molto più diffusa ...


2

The article in Italian is quite complex, because it has several forms. Easy for feminine nouns: the articles are ”la/le” (singular/plural), but the singular form is elided to ”l’” when the following word (which is not necessarily the accompanying noun) starts with a vowel: la rana (the frog) l'amica (the female friend) la migliore amica (the best female ...


1

Such a caption would be grammatically correct. However its meaning is different from the one you assume. A better translation would be The cantankerous Vincenzo To give you an idea of the connotation of the word bisbetico, the feminine form bisbetica is how the English word shrew in the title of Shakespeare famous comedy The Taming of the Shrew.


1

Credo che "che" sia necessario. E io aggiungerei anche le virgolette attorno a "serio". «Se c'è una cosa che non sei, è "serio"!»


1

It's a subject-verb inversion needed to avoid any emphatic meaning. If you do not use such inversion it sounds very much emphatically: "quali espressioni Mario e Giovanni usano?" would mean: we know what expressions they use, but are those really e.g. vulgar, or mischievous, or damaging, ...? Come on!


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible