10

If you mean a literal “&”, none of the proposed forms is meaningful. In an informal communication, you'd use the first name followed, if necessary, by e famiglia. For instance: (Saluti da) Mario e famiglia. In a formal context, you might use famiglia followed by the family name: (Sentite condoglianze), famiglia Rossi.


7

It's pretty unusual and impolite, and also shows an ignorance of at least one of the functions of language. As for which way to close a conversations, friends or close colleagues will use a normal Ciao (there is a recent custom of closing a phone call with a sequence of generally three ciaos). People who are in less intimate relation would say Arrivederci (...


5

It is not normal to sbattere/chiudere/riattaccare il telefono in faccia (hanging up a phone call) nor andarsene alla chetichella/all'inglese (slipping away quietly without saying goodbye). I personally find strange many TV series where they never say goodbye at the phone, and most of them are American. Although I must say that in some circumstances it could ...


5

You use ciao in an informal situation, with your friends and with someone you know. You use buongiorno in formal situations , when you first meet someone. It is considered a polite and respectful greet, used especially with older people. Obviously this form can be used instead of ciao but never do the opposite or you could be considered rude.


3

It might be Saluti e baci -> Salumi e caci. A Google search turns up a few examples of this pun, mixed with the literal use of these words.


2

According to this page a formal salutation could be Reverendo Padre Rossi while Egregio Padre is slightly less formal. Also according to the same page, the letter should end with a phrase like La prego di accogliere, Reverendo Canonico (NAME AND SURNAME) l'espressione dei miei sentimenti deferenti (YOUR NAME AND SURNAME) or Con ...


2

Usually is typical for an Italian person to say goodbye with "ciao" or "ci sentiamo (dopo, domani,...)" at the end of a phone call or with "arrivederci" or "ci vediamo" when leaving the house; it also depends whether it is a formal situation or not. Obviously it is impolite to hang-up without saying goodbye or some kind of salutation, but that's true no ...


1

You can find on Treccani's appellativi e epiteti [prontuario] a list of proper forms for most of ecclesiastics and their abbravistions. For a bishop: (Sua) Eccellenza (S. Ecc. o Sua Ecc.): vescovo o alto prelato; nella tradizione, prefetti e questori, e così via; for a cardinal: (Sua) Eminenza (S.E. o S. Em.), Eminentissimo (Em.mo, E.mo): ...


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