Hot answers tagged

23 votes

How do you say "Good job!" in Italian?

Bravo or Brava means "Good job!". In English, it's often used as an exclamation in the theatre, but it doesn't have to be an exclamation, nor is it restricted to the theatre context.
user avatar
17 votes
Accepted

“Avere senso” vs “fare senso”

Maybe your girlfriend did not want to be too picky on that one with you :) As far as I know there is no regional difference: I would definitely interpret fa senso! as it's disgusting! and I would ...
user avatar
  • 1,117
15 votes
Accepted

How rude is "va fa Napoli"?

"Va fa Napoli" is not an Italian reference but a phrase that sounds like it and it sounds like vaffan... that is as rude as fu_k off. If you say it in Italy we can understand what you mean but is ...
user avatar
  • 729
14 votes

How do you say "Good job!" in Italian?

Teachers say 'Ottimo!' or 'Eccellente!' or 'Ottimo lavoro!' or 'Lavoro eccellente!', but they also say 'Buon lavoro!' when a job is a 'Good job!'
user avatar
13 votes

How do you say "Good job!" in Italian?

Just to add to the other excellent answers: a simple translation as Bel lavoro! is also very common. So, good becomes beautiful/nice in the translation. On the other hand, "buon lavoro!" is ...
user avatar
  • 3,574
13 votes
Accepted

Commonality of specific romantic phrases in Italian

I use ti amo a lot, even with additions that intensify the claim. However, it isn't the exact translation of I love you de facto, as it is a real intense claim. Ti voglio bene is a claim you could use ...
user avatar
12 votes

What does "Ma tant'è" mean?

I think you received pretty good explanations of what "ma tant'è" is suppose to mean but the translations are quite literal and don't sound right to me. The best translation I can come up with is: "...
user avatar
  • 329
12 votes
Accepted

Translation of the expression "by the way"

As always, there is not a single translation that always fits. A proposito is often appropriate; depending on the register, also incidentalmente, the already-mentioned fra l'altro, or a periphrasis ...
user avatar
  • 34.6k
12 votes
Accepted

"I have no idea" in Italian

Non lo so Non lo so proprio Non ne ho idea Non ne ho la più pallida idea In ordine crescente di intensità Ovviamente ne si riferisce a qualcosa che è già stato menzionato, ma immagino che tu lo ...
user avatar
  • 1,272
11 votes
Accepted

Significato e origine dell'espressione "all'ultima spiaggia"

"Essere all'ultima spiaggia" significa (in poche parole) "essere disperati". Similmente, se qualcosa rappresenta "l'ultima spiaggia" significa che è l'ultima speranza, l'ultima possibilità. La ...
user avatar
  • 4,259
11 votes
Accepted

Che ne è di lei?

Yes, it's an idiomatic expression. It's used to ask about a person (usually when there has been no news in a while), so the meaning is roughly a mixture of "what's happened to her", "what's up with ...
user avatar
  • 4,259
10 votes

How do you say "Good job!" in Italian?

A common Italian expression is "Ben Fatto," or "well done." Here, the emphasis is on the adjectival modifier, "ben." Other expressions are "Bravo," "eccellente," or "ottimo," which are also ...
user avatar
  • 291
10 votes

What is the meaning of "mangia tu che mangio io"?

"action tu che action io" is a colloquial form to indicate that we both are doing or should do something with a will and at the same time, possibly in (usually friendly) competition: corri tu che ...
user avatar
  • 2,188
10 votes
Accepted

Filler-words in spoken Italian

Yes, there are filler words. Those you mentioned actually can be used meaningfully ("dai" is an exhortation for example). Aside from those you mentioned, other examples may be: cioè mah mmm (though ...
user avatar
9 votes

Translation of the expression "by the way"

The perfect translation would be "fra l'altro". I wouldn't translate it as "a proposito", in my opinion the meaning is slightly different.
user avatar
  • 91
9 votes

Significato e origine dell'espressione "la testa come un cesto"

Il significato di questa espressione viene spiegato nel Dizionario dei Modi di Dire Hoepli: fare la testa come un cestone (raro) Fig.: frastornare, rintronare di chiacchiere, di ...
user avatar
  • 38.2k
9 votes
Accepted

Could you explain the expression "quanti ne abbiamo oggi"?

It's an idiom, a standard phrasing Italian speakers don't even think about when using it, just like when asking in English for someone's age you apparently ask about them being more or less old, or ...
user avatar
  • 34.6k
8 votes
Accepted

What is the word for a book lover?

Not really sure why you are disappointed... but that is the word commonly used and I am not aware of any common synonym, unless you use a periphrasis and say collezionista di libri. On the issue of ...
user avatar
  • 1,117
8 votes
Accepted

How does the grammar of "Signori si nasce" and other "x si nasce" constructions work?

That's an impersonal construction, which is used quite a bit in Italian but very little in other languages like English. Impersonal constructions are used to express ideas, actions or orders in a ...
user avatar
  • 4,259
8 votes

‘Se mia nonna avesse le ruote, sarebbe una carriola’

Probable Origin Elyse Bruce indicates the earliest example to be in "Jüdische Sprichwörter und Redensarten" (Jewish Proverbs and Idioms), by Ignaz Bernstein and B.W. Segel, Frankfurt, Germany 1908. ...
user avatar
  • 81
8 votes
Accepted

Is there an Italian expression for "I've forgotten more than you'll ever know?"

An idiom I've heard occasionally is "Ne devi mangiare, di pastasciutta...", implying that the listener hasn't eaten enough pasta (which is the same as to say that they are young) to be as ...
user avatar
  • 161
8 votes

Modo di dire per esprimere "parlare senza tabù"

"Parlare senza museruola" non è, che io sappia, un modo di dire molto usato, ma il significato in questo contesto è chiaro: significa proprio parlare liberamente. Si potrebbero utilizzare espressioni ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible