Hot answers tagged

23

Bravo or Brava means "Good job!". In English, it's often used as an exclamation in the theatre, but it doesn't have to be an exclamation, nor is it restricted to the theatre context.


22

The basic fact is that there is not even an exact correspondence between the English word “date” (in the present meaning) and any Italian word. One of the nearest is appuntamento, but you can have an appuntamento with a friend, with the dentist, and so on, while talking about a date involves explicitly a romantic interest, to the point that a couple might ...


17

Maybe your girlfriend did not want to be too picky on that one with you :) As far as I know there is no regional difference: I would definitely interpret fa senso! as it's disgusting! and I would translate makes sense with ha senso (or, depending on the context è sensato). (as a side note: I am from Milan) A few examples: I ragni mi fanno senso! I am ...


16

I've heard it used even for people, but only in familiar or informal contexts; typically it's used to shoo (!) away children or people engaging in child-like disturbing behavior. Unless clearly joking (at least to some extent), I would say it's rude to use it with adult people who aren't intentionally bothering somebody: the "target" of the sciò is put at ...


15

Questa è un'espressione tipicamente bolognese. A Bologna città ricca di portici, le case erano al primo piano, mentre al pian terreno c'erano i portoni che permettevano l'ingresso nei cortili interni dei palazzi. I portoni erano collegati con una corda agli appartamenti. Così quando un ospite arrivava e voleva entrare chiedeva che qualcuno dal di dentro ...


15

"Va fa Napoli" is not an Italian reference but a phrase that sounds like it and it sounds like vaffan... that is as rude as fu_k off. If you say it in Italy we can understand what you mean but is quite ridiculous because it doesn't mean anything, it's an American stereotype if you prefer. First time that I saw Friends in original version I laughed for it. ...


14

Teachers say 'Ottimo!' or 'Eccellente!' or 'Ottimo lavoro!' or 'Lavoro eccellente!', but they also say 'Buon lavoro!' when a job is a 'Good job!'


13

Frase fatta capo ha. Dizionario dei modi di dire, proverbi e locuzioni di italiano di Giuseppe Pittàno (Zanichelli, 2009, p.202): L'identificazione h con niente è dovuta al fatto che in latino la lettera h, in origine aspirata, pian piano si attenuò fino al perdere il valore di aspirazione. Non capire un'acca quindi significa non capire niente. Translation: ...


13

Just to add to the other excellent answers: a simple translation as Bel lavoro! is also very common. So, good becomes beautiful/nice in the translation. On the other hand, "buon lavoro!" is used as an encouragement to someone who has to perform a task and you want to with her success.


13

I use ti amo a lot, even with additions that intensify the claim. However, it isn't the exact translation of I love you de facto, as it is a real intense claim. Ti voglio bene is a claim you could use more often and even in public joking with your friends, when your partner says some harsh remark that really makes you proud, for example. DaG accurately ...


12

It has the same meaning of the expression "have your cake and eat it too", that is, when there's a tradeoff you cannot have both things at the same time. In this case you have three parts: botte piena = a full barrel [of wine] moglie ubriaca = a drunk wife uva sulla vigna = grapes on the vine, the grapes used to make the wine The third part is ...


12

Non lo so Non lo so proprio Non ne ho idea Non ne ho la più pallida idea In ordine crescente di intensità Ovviamente ne si riferisce a qualcosa che è già stato menzionato, ma immagino che tu lo sappia già. Se vuoi dire: I have no idea what to do in this situation Si possono usare tutti e quattro, allo stesso modo: Non so cosa fare Non so proprio cosa ...


11

Una veloce ricerca su Google, mi ha portato a questo risultato sul sito della Treccani, da cui cito la spiegazione (in grassetto la parte più rilevante): Quando un'azione si svolge senza alcuna preparazione, producendo a volte anche un effetto di sorpresa, potremmo dire che è stata compiuta all'improvviso, di botto, di colpo, ex abrupto, improvvisamente o ...


11

I believe it comes from essere fuori di senno (having lost one's mind), which is frequently contracted in essere fuori in popular language. Then, this fuori is qualified with something which is commonly outside something else: a balcony sticks out of a house. So it's like è fuori di senno come un balcone è fuori dalla casa, but this of course loses ...


11

Alle sue origini anche il verbo fregare aveva un significato di diretto riferimento all'atto sessuale (da e.g., fricazione di corpi). Scopare potrebbe aver assunto un significato analogo nello stesso momento, questo perché l'azione caratteristica dello spazzare in terra, richiede movimenti alternati per lo più mediante un oggetto il cui manico è ...


11

I think you received pretty good explanations of what "ma tant'è" is suppose to mean but the translations are quite literal and don't sound right to me. The best translation I can come up with is: "but yeah.. It is what it is", which is something I've heard from native English speakers.


11

As always, there is not a single translation that always fits. A proposito is often appropriate; depending on the register, also incidentalmente, the already-mentioned fra l'altro, or a periphrasis like dimenticavo, or già che ci siamo and so on. [Added from a comment of mine:] To confirm that certain uses of “by the way” map perfectly on a proposito, let ...


11

"Essere all'ultima spiaggia" significa (in poche parole) "essere disperati". Similmente, se qualcosa rappresenta "l'ultima spiaggia" significa che è l'ultima speranza, l'ultima possibilità. La Treccani lo spiega bene e dà anche una spiegazione dell'origine (che non conoscevo): Con uso fig., ultima s., ultima speranza, estrema possibilità di risolvere ...


11

Yes, it's an idiomatic expression. It's used to ask about a person (usually when there has been no news in a while), so the meaning is roughly a mixture of "what's happened to her", "what's up with her", "how is she doing", "what is she doing" and so on.


10

A common Italian expression is "Ben Fatto," or "well done." Here, the emphasis is on the adjectival modifier, "ben." Other expressions are "Bravo," "eccellente," or "ottimo," which are also adjectives. "Bel lavoro" is used, but is less common, because it would put the emphasis on "job," rather than "well" or "good."


10

"action tu che action io" is a colloquial form to indicate that we both are doing or should do something with a will and at the same time, possibly in (usually friendly) competition: corri tu che corro anch'io = run, and I'm running too. It is also used for continuous actions: ci siamo visti al pomeriggio, ma, chiacchiera tu che chiacchiero io, si è fatta ...


10

Yes, there are filler words. Those you mentioned actually can be used meaningfully ("dai" is an exhortation for example). Aside from those you mentioned, other examples may be: cioè mah mmm (though not exactly a word) eh and many others. An example dialogue using all of them: A) Sai, ho visto Luca in giro con l'auto nuova. B) Eh? Strano. A) Perché? B) Eh,...


9

L'espressione "girare i pollici" è comunemente usata per dire che qualcuno perde tempo senza fare niente. È capita dalla maggior parte delle persone, visto che non è un'espressione locale. Forse dipende più dall'età della persona che dalla provenienza geografica; persone giovani potrebbero non capirla. Ho sempre sentito dire "girarsi i pollici", non "...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible