Hot answers tagged

13

I think it's useful to look at Treccani's definition of each term to find out the subtle differencies (if there are any). Starting with attrezzo, Treccani says: attrézzo s. m. [dal fr. attraits, part. pass. sostantivato plur. di attraire, che è il lat. attrahĕre «attrarre»]. – 1. Arnese o strumento qualsiasi: un a. di cucina, di bottega; per lo più al plur.,...


10

The general idea is that you are completing the first part of the sentence before the list, so punctuation goes with it. Example: Lavorare con noi ti permette di andare a casa ogni giorno alle cinque, avere pranzo gratis e ricevere una gratificazione natalizia. As you can see it's a typographical convention over a correct, Italian sentence. Another ...


8

This is a really hard question with no simple answer, mainly because of the degree of heterogeneity of word usage that one can find in spoken Italian among different regions. I myself am biased, coming from Rome. This is surely not going to be an exhaustive answer, although I hope it can give you some clues. As you have correctly inferred, they are used in ...


8

The common style is to use a semicolon at the end of every list item, and start items with lowercase letters. There is an alternative style, ending each sentence with a full stop and starting each item with a capital letter. They can be both used. It depends mainly on the publisher (for books, magazines and newspapers).


6

Bice Mortara Garavelli nel suo Prontuario di punteggiatura, Laterza 2003 (pag. 113) descrive tra gli usi dei puntini di sospensione quello di “far capire che un elenco può continuare indefinitamente (il loro valore è quello di eccetera e di espressioni consimili)” e quindi il loro uso è senz'altro ammissibile. Non fa esempi di questo uso specifico, ma visto ...


5

You can find here a list of Italian proper names (in Italian) where you can find some information about etymology and meaning. Many of them come form history, literature, or from philosophers, scientist of ancient times. For some of them is also reported if they are diminutives of a longer form, for example: TEA - Diminutivo di molti nomi femminili, ...


5

Although sometimes you do see eccetera (or etc) followed by ellipsis, in my opinion it cannot be correct. "eccetera" comes from latin "et cetera", literally "and other things"; since you already stated that the list would continue with "other things", there's nothing to be replaced by the ellipsis. Also, someone here who did some research in literary texts ...


4

Sì se la progressione è identificabile dai primi elementi esplicitati. Inoltre andrebbe ripetuto il separatore di interpunzione (nel tuo caso la virgola) dopo l'ultimo elemento e di conseguenza esso dovrebbe essere seguito da uno spazio. Quindi i quadrupedi (cani, gatti, … ) è la forma corretta (anche se quei soli due elementi dell'elenco non mi paiono ...


4

There are indeed such Wiktionary pages, though they are not exhaustive and do not contain much further information: Wiktionary: Italian male given names (830) Wiktionary: Italian diminutives of male given names (29) Wiktionary: Italian female given names (285) Wiktionary: Italian diminutives of female given names (6) The English Wikipedia pages for most ...


3

TL; DR: Such a website is unrealistic, because the relationship between names in different languages are way to messy for it to be feasible. Name correspondence between languages is always flawed and never perfect. For example, let us consider the Hebrew name Yeshua. It corresponds to two different names in Italian (as in English), Giosuè and Gesù, because ...


2

Comma + ellipsis, right. Ellipsis only, acceptable. Eccetera + ellipsis, wrong. Eccetera + comma + ellipsis, wrong and unacceptable. Eccetera + period, acceptable, but "ecc.", rather than "eccetera + period", is preferable.


2

The ones I use are comma + ellipsis, and comma + eccettera. What follows is the punctuation I would normally use: If it's the end of a sentence, I would use the period; if I am writing two connected sentences, I would use the semicolon. Ho fatto le solite cose: alzarmi, fare colazione, vestirmi, rifare il letto, eccetera. Sometimes, for emphasis, I would ...


1

Comma + ellipsis is used mainly for listing the numbers (as you would do in mathematics: 1,2,3,...). Still, there should be no space between comma and ellipsis. Ellipsis only is used for listing the words (see the grammar examples here or here or here). Eccetera means that the list is being continued, hence it could not use additional comma or ellipsis. The ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible