23

I would say: Capito! Tutto chiaro! I am from Italy and I think the best ways to express what "got it" means are those :)


18

The typical idioms are Come stai? (informal, with known people or friends) Come sta? (formal, with unknown people or important people) Come va? (always possible)


18

The "neutral" way is the literal translation: Buona fortuna! The more colloquial way (not rude or offensive, can generally be used with anyone, though it might depend on the situation) is an idiomatic expression: In bocca al lupo! to which the person who is wished luck usually replies: Crepi (il lupo)!


15

I think that a simple "auguri in ritardo" will do the job. Of course you can build on this. "Scusami! Mi sono dimenticato di augurarti buon compleanno. Auguri in ritardo!"


14

I don't think Italian has a perfect equivalent of the word overkill. You can use different terms in different situations. Translating it as eccessivamente complicato isn't optimal because overkill implies the existence of a much simpler alternative, while this translation does not give this suggestion. Translating it with esagerato comes probably closer ...


14

I'd say a ripensarci (slightly more formal) or ora che ci penso, where something like di nuovo (“again”) or meglio (“better”) is implied.


13

Informal: Come? Cosa? Eh? Come/Cosa/Che hai detto? Formal, (as suggested in a comment by @RiccardoDeContardi): Scusi? Prego? Può ripetere? Come/Cosa/Che ha detto?, the latest two usually followed by a further courtesy locution such as per favore/scusi/per cortesia.


13

You'd probably say Non ho mai fatto niente con le mie mani. Notice that: you had omitted mai, that is, “never”; it's le mie mani (not i miei mani) since mano is feminine, even though it ends in -o; in Italian it sounds more idiomatic without mentioning due.


12

Non lo so Non lo so proprio Non ne ho idea Non ne ho la più pallida idea In ordine crescente di intensità Ovviamente ne si riferisce a qualcosa che è già stato menzionato, ma immagino che tu lo sappia già. Se vuoi dire: I have no idea what to do in this situation Si possono usare tutti e quattro, allo stesso modo: Non so cosa fare Non so proprio cosa ...


12

“A temperatura ambiente”! Credo che sia il modo più diffuso; ho anche sentito, per sottolineare la richiesta, “non di frigo”.


11

As always, there is not a single translation that always fits. A proposito is often appropriate; depending on the register, also incidentalmente, the already-mentioned fra l'altro, or a periphrasis like dimenticavo, or già che ci siamo and so on. [Added from a comment of mine:] To confirm that certain uses of “by the way” map perfectly on a proposito, let ...


10

There's plenty. On the same lines of the example you cited, here some examples Non proprio intelligentissimo Non esattamente una decisione geniale Un risultato non eccezionale Or also Benone! which, depending on the tone, can be sarcastic or not. Bene ma non benissimo! is also a very typical ironic sentence, meaning neither good nor very ...


10

As already stated in comments, "più o meno" is the best way to translate "more or less", which is its literal meaning. However, there are some alternatives, like: Press'a poco All'incirca A grandi linee But the second and third ones may sound more formal and, in some cases, might not perfectly fit in the sentence.


10

Quite simply we say leggere tra le righe. leggere tra le righe Riuscire a capire anche quello che non viene chiaramente espresso oppure deliberatamente taciuto, riferito a uno scritto, a un discorso e simili.


10

Unfortunately Entre altre notizie has no meaning in Italian. If you mean In other news you could translate it with cambiando argomento or passando ad altro. The expression cari colleghi is fine at the beginning of a letter, corresponding to "dear colleagues".


10

Il termine burocratico sarebbe "Assenza per malattia" o "Congedo per malattia"; io tradurrei quindi to be on sick leave con: Essere (o stare) in congedo per malattia oppure Essere (o stare) assente per malattia Si usa anche, ma solo come espressione informale: Mettersi in malattia Anche "Essere in malattia" si usa proprio in questo senso (e non ...


9

The perfect translation would be "fra l'altro". I wouldn't translate it as "a proposito", in my opinion the meaning is slightly different.


9

IMHO the other answer is translating "how are you doing". If you are unsure what register to use etc., you can use "Tutto bene?". It's not as common, but it's never wrong: in Bakuriu's example, "Buongiorno professore, tutto bene?" is as formally correct as such a question can possibly be.


9

"Qual è il tuo nome?" is correct, but it's rarely used. "Come ti chiami?" is more frequent. Moreover, please note that while in English "You" is used even with strangers, in Italian there's a difference: If you know who you're talking with, or you're in a very informal context, you have to use the second person singular (eg "Come ti chiami?") Else, you have ...


9

It's quite likely to be a local pronunciation of per piacere, which literally means “please”, but may be used to exhort one to do something. As Charo remarks, the not-too-different Sicilian version pi piaciri is often found in Andrea Camilleri's books.


9

Alla lettera direi "autore originale". Da una ricerca su Google, questo è anche l'uso diffuso, anche se non sono riuscito a trovare una fonte abbastanza autorevole, e non so se TripAdvisor o Plreply meritino la tramoggia. Su Usenet ho visto usare "capothread" in senso metonimico, per indicare non solo il primo post ma anche il suo autore (non è una ...


8

"Buona fortuna" is the literal translation of "Good luck". If you're in an informal context (eg talking to friends), you may want to use "In bocca al lupo" (literally: [go] into the wolf's mouth) instead.


8

In addition to Elisabetta's answer, you could use: (Ho) capito (literal translation) Ok Va bene What Google Translates says is however wrong and far from the intended meaning.


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