12 votes
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"Chiunque altro" oppure "qualunque altro"?

Intanto, "qualunque altro" da solo non si potrebbe dire, perché "qualunque" è un aggettivo e non un pronome, a differenza di "chiunque". In questo caso, poi, si sta confrontando quella ricerca con ...
DaG's user avatar
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9 votes
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The use of "ciò" in a sentence

It is a masculine pronoun, only singular, and it indicates or replaces the noun of a thing, generally referred as a verb or a phrase, it can be both subject and complement. It has neutral value and ...
abarisone's user avatar
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9 votes

Is it necessary to use pronouns with the verb "essere"?

No, it is not necessary to use personal pronouns with any verb, in particular not with the verb essere. Using a technical language we can say that Italian is a "null-subject" language. ...
Denis Nardin's user avatar
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9 votes

Is it necessary to use pronouns with the verb "essere"?

Your teacher is wrong and your examples are perfect. The subject pronoun can be used, for emphasis or for marking distinctions: I would say Io sono italiano, lei è catalana. when asked about me ...
egreg's user avatar
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8 votes
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Does "nessuno" translate to "no one" or "anyone"?

Yes, double negatives are grammatical, and common, in Italian. See on this monolingual dictionary, for instance: Se posposto al verbo, è di solito rafforzato da altra negazione (non, né, senza, ecc.)....
Federico Poloni's user avatar
8 votes
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Signora or Signorina when marriage status unknown

Probably neither. Since in Italian whoever as a laurea (the lowest universitary degree) is entitled to be called dottore, or dottoressa for a female, chances are that whoever holds a high-level post ...
DaG's user avatar
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7 votes
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Which pronoun for formal second person plural?

Short answer: it's really uncommon to use loro in this case. You may want to use voi even in a formal conversation. Why? I don't really know. Perhaps, because voi was used in the past for the plurale ...
maxadamo's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why is it said "la pensi così" and not "lo pensi così"?

The simple answer is that this is an idiomatic form, and that la penso/i/... così is a standard way to say, more or less, “this is my opinion”. To go deeper, in situation like this, la can be ...
DaG's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why always "Lei" instead of "lui" in formal speech, irrespective of addressee's sex?

According to La Grammatica Italiana, by the Istituto Treccani Until the fourteenth century the system of allocutive pronouns was composed only by tu and voi as a form of respect. The first ...
Denis Nardin's user avatar
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7 votes

Does Italian have a demonstrative pronoun for 2nd person?

Sounds like you are looking for codesto, nowadays rarely used outside of Tuscany: codésto (o cotésto) agg. e pron. dimostr. [lat. eccu(m) tibi iste]. – Indica persona o cosa vicina a chi ascolta, o ...
6 votes
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'Grazie a te' o 'Ti grazie'?

In ti amo, ti is the direct object. It is not changeable into amo a te, but only into amo te (the same as the English “I love you”). In grazie a te there is an implicit verb: (dico) grazie a te. In ...
egreg's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is there any implicit or idiomatic difference between "gli" and "lo" used as a clitic pronoun?

There is indeed a big difference: one is used for the direct object and the other is used for the indirect object. Those are different grammatical roles and using one for the other is a serious ...
Denis Nardin's user avatar
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6 votes

Help me understand the word "spiegargliele"

Your translation is correct, and your assumption about "gli" is correct, too. This kind of suffix formed with a pronoun in Italian is called clitico. The whole phrase becomes: "Bisogna sempre" = it ...
Riccardo De Contardi's user avatar
6 votes
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Meaning of "che ne so che me stai a di' la verità?"

Ne is used in this context as "pronome personale" (personal pronoun). It means "di ciò" ("of this {topic/person/whatever}"). Che ne so is a very common spoken expression meaning what/how would I know ...
aetonsi's user avatar
  • 314
6 votes

"Sbagliare": non-reflexive vs reflexive usage

The differences are subtle, IMHO, and this is by no means a complete answer. However, I will list common situations where these expressions are used, and how it can often be confusing. The two can in ...
Easymode44's user avatar
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6 votes
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"Gli diede tutto il suo denaro." Why does this start with the article 'gli'?

As you can see in the VIVIT website, from Accademia della Crusca, the word "gli" in Italian is not only an article: it's also an indirect object personal pronoun. This is the case in your ...
Charo's user avatar
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5 votes
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Uso e significato di "uscirsene"

In italiano esistono moltissimi verbi che, uniti a particelle pronominali o riflessive, subiscono un cambiamento di significato, a volte minimo, in altri casi molto diverso. Questi verbi sono molto ...
abarisone's user avatar
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5 votes
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Articolo determinativo con il possessivo

You can say both, even if I'd say the former is usually the normally used form. The latter can be used with proper voice intonation in order to clearly state that the bread is yours. Another little ...
abarisone's user avatar
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5 votes

Quando si usano "egli", "ella", "esso", "essa", "essi", "esse" invece di "lui", "lei" o "loro"?

I pronomi personali soggetto di 3a persona sono: egli, lui ed esso per il singolare maschile; ella, lei ed essa per il singolare femminile; loro, essi/esse per il plurale. Fonte della tabella: ...
alexjo's user avatar
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5 votes

Meaning of "non se ne parla"

“Si non ne parla” is ungrammatical. The negation must go before the reflexive pronoun, which is changed into se because followed by another pronoun (ne): non se ne parla that is, we/people don't ...
egreg's user avatar
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5 votes
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La campagna di cui si è ... "parlato" o "parlata"?

La questione dell'accordo con i participi è sempre spinosa (con una generale tendenza a perdere le concordanze, ma con diversi casi ed eccezioni), ma qui è piuttosto semplice: va bene il maschile. ...
DaG's user avatar
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5 votes
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Do we have gender declension for pronoun "qualcuno"?

Neither is correct. Besides the fact that it is c'è, not c'e, did you mean “there are no stars in the sky” or “there are some stars in the sky”? In the former case, it is Non c'è nessuna stella in ...
DaG's user avatar
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5 votes
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Can "ne" be used to refer to 1.) animate objects and 2.) an argument of a noun?

The original meaning of ne (from Latin inde) is “from there”, as in entrò in casa e ne uscì dopo qualche minuto. But in modern Italian it's a normal 3rd- and 6th-person pronoun, to be used in all ...
DaG's user avatar
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Ce lo beviamo noi = Lo beviamo noi stessi?

There is a little difference between the two sentences: the first phrase is colloquially used when who talks is glad to drink (we would like to drink it, and so we are glad to drink it – positive ...
CB18's user avatar
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5 votes
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Redundant direct object pronoun

As you can see at Treccani Encyclopedia, which gives an example very similar to your sentence (see example number (55)) Lo sai che Gianluca sta male? this kind of construction is what is called "...
Charo's user avatar
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5 votes

Why always "Lei" instead of "lui" in formal speech, irrespective of addressee's sex?

§9.6 of Maiden's A Linguistic History of Italian: Pronouns of address The CL second person pronouns distinguished singular (TU) and plural (UOS). This system is continued in many southern ...
Geremia's user avatar
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5 votes
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Meaning of "se ne devono andare"

As a first, informal approximation, one may think andarsene as a kind of “phrasal verb”, composed of a “normal” verb (andare) and some suitable particles (in this case, a personal pronoun followed by ...
DaG's user avatar
  • 36.6k
4 votes

Pronomi combinati con 'ci'

La regola è che «davanti a lo, la, li, le e ne la i di un altro pronome atono si trasforma in e: mi lo>me lo, ci ne>ce ne, ecc. Inoltre le e gli diventano glie invariabile, che normalmente si scrive ...
DaG's user avatar
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