15

Using the Italian keyboard layout on Linux (at least on Ubuntu 14.04), you can get the uppercase versions by engaging caps lock. For example, to type É, I turn on caps lock and press shift-è. I'm not sure whether this works on Windows and Mac, though. In practice, I've noticed that Italians will often append an apostrophe in place of a grave accent when the ...


15

Traditional Italian usage admits the n-dash in couples only. To rewrite one of your examples: «Juventus – as you may know – has won the most Scudetti». The single dash to introduce a clause at the end of a sentence is quite recently borrowed from English, but doesn't belong to usual Italian punctuation. To quote from Bice Mortara Garavelli, Prontuario di ...


12

The guillemet («…») is the traditional quotation mark used in Italian, but it has been nowadays replaced from the double quotes (“…”). The single quotation marks (‘…’) are used for nested quotations. Depending on the newspaper, you could still see the guillemet being used for quotations. Reference Use of ...


8

On the PC, special Italian characters, many of which are not present on Italian keyboards, can be inserted using the following ALT codes. To use these, first ensure that the Num Lock key has been pressed once so that it has become enabled (this key is also known as the BI Num key on Italian keyboards); usually a green LED above the keyboard will light up ...


7

In handwritten Italian, double quotes are used almost universally for reported speech. The matter is less standardised in print. Distinct publishing houses have distinct guidelines, but AFAIK they all fall into three cases: Those using guillemets («…») and reserving double quotes for other functions. Those using upper double quotes (“…”). Those using long ...


6

That would be the corresponding of present-day “&”, a glyph originated from a cursive ligature as a single character of an “e” and a “t”, to form Latin conjunction “et”, that is, “and”. And indeed it was and is still used in Italian, English and other languages to mean “and”. It's usually called “ampersand” in English and e commerciale in Italian. Image ...


6

Bice Mortara Garavelli nel suo Prontuario di punteggiatura, Laterza 2003 (pag. 113) descrive tra gli usi dei puntini di sospensione quello di “far capire che un elenco può continuare indefinitamente (il loro valore è quello di eccetera e di espressioni consimili)” e quindi il loro uso è senz'altro ammissibile. Non fa esempi di questo uso specifico, ma visto ...


5

If we look at the first page of the “Prohemio” (modern Italian, “Proemio”), we see which shows some peculiarities. The most prominent is the usage of “&” instead of et. But we also see usages of “h” which modern Italian has dropped (humana, haver, havuto, hebbe) because it doesn't correspond to a sound (except in the verbal forms ho, hai and hanno). ...


5

Windows: I guess there's only one way to do it (corrections are welcome): ALT+Numerical keyboard combination. For example È is ALT+0200. Since the moment there are very few cases that requires diactritics uppercase and È is the most common, learning the combination will do the job easily even if most people will write: "E'". Programs like Word should correct ...


4

Sì se la progressione è identificabile dai primi elementi esplicitati. Inoltre andrebbe ripetuto il separatore di interpunzione (nel tuo caso la virgola) dopo l'ultimo elemento e di conseguenza esso dovrebbe essere seguito da uno spazio. Quindi i quadrupedi (cani, gatti, … ) è la forma corretta (anche se quei soli due elementi dell'elenco non mi paiono ...


4

I used to attend a school for translators, and all the translators who gave us lessons used to tell us that the m-dash is actually allowed by Italian grammar but no more in use, so we SHOULD NOT use it while translating from English or German; instead, we could turn it into brackets, commas or other punctuation, as the case requires.


4

Nowadays there is not a fixed rule. I translate into Italian for several publishers and journals, and the guidelines are about equally divided among those prescribing «…» and those prescribing “…”. Single quotes, on the other hand, are almost always reserved for quotes within quotes and the like.


4

I am not sure there is a single Italian style guide accepted or used by all or most in the publishing industry (I am not sure this is the case for English either, at least if we consider together AmE and BrE). Most publishers have their own Norme editoriali, especially for such stuff as punctuation, dialogues, several types of inverted commas, abbreviations, ...


3

In my experience, I have found that many people simply resort to E' for È/É, A' for À, and so on. However, there are also some OS-specific tricks: Windows: there is no easy way. Some may employ Alt combinations (just like Alt+125 prints }, there are Alt combinations for uppercase accented letters), some may use charmap, some may use word processors which ...


3

When using Linux you may use Compose Keys and map the right control, for example, to be the Compose key. This can be done under Keyboard/Keymapping settings tool of your Desktop Manager. Then you'll be able to use several default mappings as well as create your own set of key mapping. I was not able to use Compose Keys on OS/X although they work well on ...


3

Maybe I'm missing the point here, but if you set your language to US International, and I assume various others, this is easy. Apostrophe (') then shift-E produces É. Backquote (`) then shift-E produces È. Various other combinations are available. I don't know about using the Italian language profile itself.


3

Wikipedia says When using Microsoft Windows, the standard Italian keyboard layout does not allow one to write 100% correct Italian language, since it lacks capital accented vowels, and in particular the È key. The common workaround is writing E' (E followed by an apostrophe) instead, or relying on the auto-correction feature of several word ...


2

I would say to use «…» when reporting a direct speech or a dialogue, while “…” when reporting an indirect one. You usually find «…» in Italian books, while “…” is very often used in newspapers when using someone else's textual words thoughts in the writer arguments. I give you two examples: Novel style Disse Galileo uscendo di prigione: «Eppur si muove!». «...


2

Personally, I use the US-International layout, which has the benefit of using the Alt-Gr key to negate the need to switch between different keyboard layouts. It works correctly with Caps Lock and with shift (the letters are correctly converted to their uppercase equivalents). It also has the added advantage of not requiring you to learn new layouts when ...


2

To enter diacritics in Windows I would suggest this keyboard layout. Certainly, you can create a "layout of your dream" :) with Microsoft Keyboard Layout Editor. However it's a bit boring, so I'd stay with the first option (which essentially is the product of such a generator). With this layout you could enter lowercase diacritics with <right-alt>+<...


1

French here. We have accents as well, and academic rules state that you don't have to put accents on uppercase letters. While handwriting, it can be diffidult to put accents, as it was on machine typing. The exception was likely made due to the uselessness of accents on first-letter uppercase. However, you have several ways to put accents. First is to let ...


1

With an Italian keyboard, if you press alt+9, you get a combination that lets you insert a grave accent over any vowel (even uppercase); alt+8 gives you the acute accent. But most people don't bother; they just put an apostrophe after the uppercase vowel (especially E', to distinguish it from the conjunction.


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