6 votes
Accepted

16th-century character

That would be the corresponding of present-day “&”, a glyph originated from a cursive ligature as a single character of an “e” and a “t”, to form Latin conjunction “et”, that is, “and”. And indeed ...
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5 votes

16th-century character

If we look at the first page of the “Prohemio” (modern Italian, “Proemio”), we see which shows some peculiarities. The most prominent is the usage of “&” instead of et. But we also see usages of “...
egreg's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

What is the Italian equivalent of The Chicago Manual of Style?

I am not sure there is a single Italian style guide accepted or used by all or most in the publishing industry (I am not sure this is the case for English either, at least if we consider together AmE ...
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