Hot answers tagged

15

Traditional Italian usage admits the n-dash in couples only. To rewrite one of your examples: «Juventus – as you may know – has won the most Scudetti». The single dash to introduce a clause at the end of a sentence is quite recently borrowed from English, but doesn't belong to usual Italian punctuation. To quote from Bice Mortara Garavelli, Prontuario di ...


5

Although sometimes you do see eccetera (or etc) followed by ellipsis, in my opinion it cannot be correct. "eccetera" comes from latin "et cetera", literally "and other things"; since you already stated that the list would continue with "other things", there's nothing to be replaced by the ellipsis. Also, someone here who did some research in literary texts ...


4

La cosa più semplice che puoi fare è leggere molto, scegliendo testi di generi diversi: dagli articoli di giornale ai romanzi. In questo caso, prediligi opere moderne e contemporanee ai classici della letteratura: testi troppo vecchi potrebbero usare vocaboli, grafie e costruzioni sintattiche che oggi non si usano più o si usano pochissimo, quindi sono meno ...


4

I am not sure there is a single Italian style guide accepted or used by all or most in the publishing industry (I am not sure this is the case for English either, at least if we consider together AmE and BrE). Most publishers have their own Norme editoriali, especially for such stuff as punctuation, dialogues, several types of inverted commas, abbreviations, ...


4

Di: preposition, "of", "from" and others. Il libro di Marco. Dì: substantive, a bit antiquated/literary but still used here and there, "day". La sera del dì di festa. Di': imperative of "dire". Di' la verità. Edit: perhaps also: Ne: adverb, pronoun (does not have an english counterpart). Non ne sapevo nulla. Né: conjunction, "neither/nor". Né l'uno né l'...


4

I don't know "trichotomous" or "quadrichotomous" words other than the ones mentioned in the question and by @DaG, but there are plenty "dicotomous" words, whose third form represents a common error: Fa => musical note, third person of the present indicative of "fare" (to do) / fa' => imperative of fare, second person singular; Sta => third person singular ...


4

Off the top of my head, hoping in further contributions: e meaning “and”; è meaning “(he/she/it) is”; e' ancient (also used in modern Tuscan), truncated form for ei, that is, egli (“he”) or essi ("they"). As this word is a proclitic word, it is pronounced together with the following word which is the one that is stressed. Another archaic and modern Tuscan ...


4

I used to attend a school for translators, and all the translators who gave us lessons used to tell us that the m-dash is actually allowed by Italian grammar but no more in use, so we SHOULD NOT use it while translating from English or German; instead, we could turn it into brackets, commas or other punctuation, as the case requires.


2

Comma + ellipsis, right. Ellipsis only, acceptable. Eccetera + ellipsis, wrong. Eccetera + comma + ellipsis, wrong and unacceptable. Eccetera + period, acceptable, but "ecc.", rather than "eccetera + period", is preferable.


2

The ones I use are comma + ellipsis, and comma + eccettera. What follows is the punctuation I would normally use: If it's the end of a sentence, I would use the period; if I am writing two connected sentences, I would use the semicolon. Ho fatto le solite cose: alzarmi, fare colazione, vestirmi, rifare il letto, eccetera. Sometimes, for emphasis, I would ...


2

I have an amazing and updated suggestion for you that I have recently found out! I went to a Professional communication and writing skill class in Milano (università Cattolica) and these were the books that they have suggested. Guida di stile, Luisa Carrada. Struttura e sintassi, Luisa Carrada. They are extremely easy and accessible, super short and ...


2

I would recommend you this site: http://www.busuu.com I'm not sure if this resource is nowadays as good as it was in the past because I haven't been using it very much lately and some people told me that it has changed in worse (I don't know if that's true). But I can assure you that my written Italian has improved a lot with it. It works as a social ...


1

Sono completamente d'accordo con quanto detto da @secan nella sua risposta: leggere è assolutamente necessario per acquistare la padronanza della scrittura. Ma, secondo la mia esperienza, è altrettanto importante procurarsi delle occasioni per scrivere testi in italiano con certa assiduità. Puoi cominciare con piccoli testi e, poco a poco, provare a farli ...


1

The answer has been found by @DaG after some chasing, and it is located on the last six lines of page 2 of Vincenzo Galilei, Dialogo della Musica Antica et della Moderna, reproduced here: Thanks also goes do Dava Sobel that included the quotation on her book (Galileo's Daughter) and then the text was picked up by her translator (Roberta Zuppet) who then ...


1

L'uso del trattino lungo in italiano è stato introdotto dalle traduzioni di libri dall'inglese. Ha generalmente lo scopo di inserire un'interruzione nel testo, per introdurre un discorso diretto. Rif. Enciclopedia Treccani


1

Reading (books, magazines, ...) in Italian. Write something everyday (maybes start a blog/diary in Italian). Specialized books (like Scrivere bene (o quasi). Ortografia, punteggiatura, stile, dubbi, curiosità; by Elisabetta Perini). Get a good tutor/teacher, who can check your text from time to time.


1

Comma + ellipsis is used mainly for listing the numbers (as you would do in mathematics: 1,2,3,...). Still, there should be no space between comma and ellipsis. Ellipsis only is used for listing the words (see the grammar examples here or here or here). Eccetera means that the list is being continued, hence it could not use additional comma or ellipsis. The ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible