Federico Bonelli
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"Perdere" vs "perdersi"
2 votes

It all becomes clearer if you paraphrase it a bit. Non sanno cosa si sono persi can be expressed as Non sanno cosa hanno perso per loro stessi That is because they're missing an event that ...

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Italian pronunciation of the differential dx
3 votes

Three main differential calculus notations exists: Newton's, favored in physics Leibniz's, favored in multidimensional maths Lagrange', favored in maths on a single dimension Others exist but they ...

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Ways of paying the bill at a restaurant
2 votes

"Pagare alla romana" is the only widely-spread expression linking a city (or geographical area) to a method of splitting restaurant bills. Since Italian costumes vary a lot following geographical ...

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Differenza fra 'cazzaro' e 'fancazzista'
8 votes

Cazzaro si dice di colui che dice abitualmente cazzate, cioè falsità. Sinonimi possibili sono il bugiardo, o il conta frottole. Fancazzista si dice di colui che abitualmente (non) fa un cazzo, cioè ...

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"Long overdue" in Italian
9 votes

In addition to what I.M. already put in his answer I wanted to add that a generic overdue time is often called "ritardo". This is valid in many cases: "The job was completed past its due time" = "...

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Is there a connection between Marco Polo and Emilione?
3 votes

Just my two cents before somebody gives a proper answer. The common theory about the name is that in the book many descriptions about foreign and exotic reigns are pretty exaggerated. The horses in ...

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Do women tend to use the word 'adorabile' more often than men?
3 votes

It is a fact that in the Italian language the verb "adorare" is used mainly when referring to God, or a deity in general. With the same meaning it can be used when referring to a person of the ...

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