3

Does "shot of espresso" translate into Italian as "colpo di caffé espresso", or is there a different way of saying this, such as tazza?

8
  • 2
    As a native Italian speaker, I've never encountered the expression "colpo di caffé espresso" (please notice the Italian word is "caffé", with a double "f"). In general, we do not even specify "espresso" and simply say "un caffé" ("espresso" is implied, and we have to specify only if we do not want an espresso). For what concern the "shot", we use that term (in English) in reference to super alcoholic drinks but not for coffee. In conclusion, I'd translate "shot of espresso" with "caffé *ristretto*"
    – secan
    Apr 12 at 7:32
  • 1
    @ZabZonk, while I agree "caffettino" is informal, I'd say it is used as term of endearment rather than as diminutive and it suggests the idea of "well deserved" and/or "enjoyable" rather than "small".
    – secan
    Apr 12 at 7:47
  • 1
    “caffè” (with grave accent `, not *café, nor *caffé).
    – DaG
    Apr 12 at 7:52
  • 1
    @secan. Apart for the accent, I agree with your comments. If you'll transform them into an answer, I'd upvote it!
    – DaG
    Apr 12 at 7:54
  • 1
    Thanks @DaG; not for the upvote, but because I just learnt I've pronounced "caffè" in the wrong way for all my life. XD
    – secan
    Apr 12 at 8:17
5

As a native Italian speaker, I've never encountered the expression "colpo di caffè espresso" (please notice the Italian word is "caffè", with a double "f"). In general, we do not even specify "espresso" and simply say "un caffè" ("espresso" is implied, and we have to specify only if we do not want an espresso). For what concerns the "shot", we use that term (in English) in reference to super alcoholic drinks but not for coffee. In conclusion, I'd translate "shot of espresso" with "caffè ristretto"

While I agree the word "caffettino" (as suggested by @ZabZonk) is informal, I'd say it is used as term of endearment rather than as diminutive and it suggests the idea of "well deserved" and/or "enjoyable" rather than "small".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.