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14

From Dizionario Etimologico della Lingua Italiana (Cortellazzo-Zoli): Cenacolo - stanza ove anticamente si cenava, e, in particolare, luogo nel quale Gesù e gli Apostoli consumarono l'ultima cena (referenced in the works of the Dominican friar Domenico Cavalca) While in Latin cenaculum was used generically as the place where people ate, in Italian it ...


10

The only abbreviation I'm aware of is "Adri", like user519 states. It can be used for the less frequent female name "Adriana" as well. Note that, like many Italian name abbreviations ending with the "i" sound, it can both be written locally ending with an "i", or with an "y" to give it an international tone. ...


8

I'd say that there is an enormous variability, mainly along social and regional axes, as well as more than one type of soprannomi. The simplest case – not even actual nicknames – is the fact that, especially for longer names, friends often use a shortened version of the name. In Rome (and in most of the South) it is almost automatic to truncate a name after ...


7

There is not a single meaning, and -ni cannot be considered to be a single suffix. The three examples you give show at least two different cases. -ini is often the plural form of an original -ino, which is most of times the suffix for a diminutive form (coltello, knife; coltellino, little knife, cutter). -oni is, analogously, often the plural of -one, the ...


6

The usage of the article is not correct in written Italian, but it's used in colloquial language and depends on the location. For example, here in Tuscany the articles are used every time for female name or surname and male surname. I don't know why it isn't used for male names, but so it is :) . An other example, I heard some people from Milan speak ...


6

Canadian (or other) provinces are not a frequent conversation topic, but whenever they are mentioned they are called province. This is confirmed by atlases and reference books, and I can assure you that informal Italian has not coined a different special term for them.


5

Family names are family names, and their suffixes (or other components) don't convey any special meaning right now; if anything, they did so centuries ago, when they came to be. It's very rare in modern Italian to modify a present-day family name. In the special case of your example, by the way, “Sorrento” is (also) a city name, while “sorrentino” means “...


5

Maybe call it scimmiotto. The suffix -otto sounds cute in Italian, so it fits to a pet, regardless of age or size.


5

In questo specifico caso, Renzy puo' essere semplicemente la storpiatura di Renzie (a sua volta derivato da un'analogia fatta fra Renzi e il personaggio Fonzie). Questo l'ho trovato soprattutto nei commenti degli utenti, non tanto nei titoli della stampa.


5

Both Michele and Angelo can be shortened to Lino, through Michele->Michelino (diminutive suffix) -> Lino. In spoken Italian you may hear Miche / Miché and Ange (or Michi and Angi, but the -i suffix suggests more a feminine name in my view). Because of the strong English culture influence, I wouldn't be surprised to hear Mike, too (pronounced like in English)...


5

In Italian the 8th of March holiday is called: "la festa della donna". The translation of a "woman's day" means literally: "il giorno della donna", but in Italian we use more "la festa della donna ". The phrase you wrote in your question is in Spanish I guess...


5

Actually that is a dialect-driven form. For instance, in Parma (place where I live) we say "la Giulia" or "la Paola" - but this is only true for female names. However, in Milan, people say "il Giulio" or "il Paolo" (male names), but Giulia and Paola (female names). Some dialects, especially in the North of Italy, use one of the two forms (or both). Some ...


4

Cenacolo comes from latin and literally means the place where you eat. "Il Cenacolo" began the name of the place where "L'ultima Cena" happened.


4

They share the same suffix, but for different reasons. Antonioni could be a "gentilizio" (en: gentilitial), that indicates the family's origin (Antonio family). The others, as DaG said, could indicate nickname or provenance. If you are curious you can find meaning and origin of Italian surnames here: Cognomix.


4

I have a friend named Michelangelo. His friends call him with the whole name, Michelangelo, even if it's a mouthful. His aunt is the only one that calls him Angelo, but several people call him Michèle or Michè. His fiancée calls him Mìchi (or maybe it's Miki -- they're pronounced the same). The whole family has lived in Florence for as long as anyone ...


3

"Scimmia" is for both genders. In Italian there are many animals with female name for both genders, for instance: zebra, vipera, marmotta, balena, ...


3

La pronuncia contemporanea del nome Elena è sempre "Èlena". Si può facilmente notare come molti video in italiano su Elena Ferrante utilizzino questa pronuncia (esempi: Carlo Lucarelli https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8SxSBSOCYA; Antonio Monda https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RR7mtGjVm7Q), mentre la pronuncia "Elèna" viene utilizzata soprattutto da autori ...


3

It's common in most part of northern Italy. I live in Piedmont where habits change according to the area. In some city or village people use the definite article both for female and male names, in other areas people don't use article in front of names at all. Contrary to a comment I've read, to use articles isn't a mistake in our regional Italian. It's a ...


2

Multiple sources make note of how this phenomenon is commonly encountered in vernacular speech, specifically in northern Italy. However it is stigmatized in formal and written Italian: ... in some Italian dialects feminine but not masculine proper names must appear with a definite article (Elena Guerzoni, p.c.). Why Rose is the Rose: On the use of ...


2

According to Michele Brunelli it is mandatory in Venetian to use the article for that case: L'artìcolo personale, che 'l se cata in vèneto e in catalan (ma nò in italian), el xe l'artìcolo che se dòpara davanti i nomi propi de persona. El vèneto el ga solo che el personal feminile: la Maria, la Làura, la Giovana... What you see is the transpose of our ...


2

It's common in the spoken language of Northern Italy in familiar and informal contexts. The article serves the purpose of letting you to refer to a specific person, known to all the people involved in the conversation. In a sentence like "hai visto la Maria di recente?", "la Maria" is that precise "Maria" that we both know - relative, parent, neighbor, ...


2

This is incorrect in formal Italian but used in informal Italian in northern Italy. In some places like Lombardy article "Il" is used before masculine names too, like "Il Mario" or "Il Giuseppe"


2

Gli esempi più conosciuti sono (da Città italiane e i loro appellativi): Roma – città eterna, caput mundi Roma è una delle città più antiche del mondo e da qui deriva il suo appellativo “città eterna. La chiamano anche “caput mundi”, ovvero “centro/capitale del mondo” perché nell’epoca romana era il punto più importante del mondo conosciuto. ...


1

One known variant is "Michelangiolo" See: https://books.google.com/books?id=Rba0bvYlNFIC&pg=PA709&lpg=PA709&dq=origine+del+nome+michelangiolo&source=bl&ots=STvDsN1RU-&sig=D-CQajK72mNmT5OZa6lZZID2nwM&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi-uMbwwYvRAhVK0FQKHYBZDvYQ6AEIGjAA#v=onepage&q=origine%20del%20nome%20michelangiolo&f=false


1

I agree with @user519 on "Adri" and I would like to add something about its pronunciation. Due to the effort in articulating the cluster /d/ + /r/, the voiced alveolar fricative may sound doubled and the /a/ shorter (/addri/). Just to make myself understood, this also happens in some regional dialects with the word "libro" which becomes /...


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