19

There's more than one reason for that. The structure of the Italian keyboard I believe that the major reason has to be researched in the Italian keyboard: indeed, the key for è and é is the same. If it is pressed without any other keys, it outputs "è", while if it's used in combination with "Maiusc", it outputs "é". My guess is ...


18

“Doubled consonants” are a distinctive characteristic of Italian; depending on the regional variant, this “doubling” can be more or less long. Typically, in Italian of the northern regions the amoung of “doubling” is usually weak, while it's more evident in central and southern Italy. The English term is geminate. The digraph gn is almost always realized as ...


14

First of all, it's probably worth noting that gli is not univocally pronounced, but it actually depends on the context - meaning its position in a word. According to the Enciclopedia Treccani, it depends on the letters sorrounding it. when it comes right after a n, it's biconsonantico, i.e. you pronounce both the g and the l. Some examples are: ganglio and ...


13

The unstressed e is always pronounced closed ([e] in IPA). The classical example of a minimal pair is pesca, which is ['pɛsca] when it means “the peach” ['pesca] when it means ”fishing” But regional pronunciation varies; in Northern Italy, both words usually have the closed e. In several local pronunciation schemes in Calabria there's no distinction ...


13

The rules, as far as I can tell, are the following: Letters are pronounced the Italian way HTML: acca-ti-emme-elle XML: ics-emme-elle C: ci Nouns are pronounced as English, which often is similar to Italian Prolog BASIC Smalltalk Exceptions C++ is pronounced ci-più-più (più being "plus" in Italian), probably because the ++ unary operator is ...


13

Luciano Canepàri in his DiPI (Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana) defines Tuscany, Umbria, Marche, Lazio and Rome as “regioni standardizzanti” (regions where a standard-like pronunciation of standard Italian is used), and separates Rome from Lazio, as the capital has some peculiar characteristics, closer to those of Tuscany. Those regional pronunciations are ...


13

It is not a real liaison, but a phenomenon that is formalised most in prosody, for poems and song lyrics: it is called synaloepha (in Italian, sinalefe), and consists in having two consecutive syllables count – and be uttered – as one. It happens when the first ends, and the second starts, with a vowel (as you have seen in that song). For a more classical ...


13

No. È un suono onomatopeico (https://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Onomatopea). "Bump" anche nei fumetti indica di solito una collisione, o meglio il suono emesso a seguito di una caduta o un tonfo. In questo caso viene utilizzato credo in modo sarcastico per indicare che la giornalista è piombata all'improvviso alle sue conclusioni come un avvoltoio. Sim. "...


13

Conventionally, people say that Italian verbs fall into three categories, or conjugations: those ending in -are, in -ere and in -ire. Those in -ere, however, correspond to two different conjugations in Latin (where there were four conjugations for verbs): those in -ēre, where “ē” is a long, and stressed, vowel (2nd Latin conjugation); and those in -ĕre, ...


12

RAI has a pronunciation dictionary available where you can get both the written pronunciation and a spoken sample. Examples Ascoli Empoli Cesare


12

Your assignation is not standard (even if there is not an official standard): for instance, for M most people would pick Milano, and to connect a letter and a city name one often uses come (“D come Domodossola”). Anyway, there is an Italian Wikipedia article about the so-called “Alfabeto telefonico italiano”, which gives the following table (here simplified ...


10

I personally pronounce "pésca" and "pèsca" in the same way. In most cases, the difference is understood from the context, not from the accent. The accent may vary from region to region: in Veneto, the closed "e" is the most used, while in Lombardia people use open "e" more often. So, quite nobody in Italy pays attention to this pronunciation difference ...


9

I may be able to shed some more light on the issue with geminated consonants. While I don't speak more than a few words of Italian, my native language is Finnish, which also makes a phonemic distinction between long and short consonants. First of all, let me mention that I do hear a long [k:] in most of the pronunciation samples that you link to — ...


9

For a number of word endings the stress is predictable. For instance, all superlative forms in -issimo are “sdrucciole” (i.e., stressed on the third-from-last syllable): bellìssimo, velocìssimo and so on. The same holds for most moods and tenses of verbs, and suffixes, and other regular modifications of words. You can find many of them in the online ...


8

Historical note. Until about the '50s (I do not have a precise date) in Italian books some accents were written "the other way around", i.e. using the grave accents where one would use the acute one today and the other way around. "Perché" was one of these words. For example, have a look at the following page of this novel from 1902, third paragraph: […] ...


8

Unfortunately there's no rule available, for proper names. Accents on toponyms, like in graeca verba, sine lege vagantur. Just to name a few in my surroundings: Albignàsego Trebaséleghe Sambrusón (it should be Sanbrusón, but that's another matter) Grùmolo (delle Abbadesse) Bagnòli Bagnòlo Some names have suffixes that help in guessing the right accent, ...


8

My ear as an Italian and, more verifiably, the pronunciation given in Migliorini, Tagliavini and Fiorelli's Dizionario d'ortografia e di pronunzia agree in saying that the correct way is the first one. The DOP, precisely, gives it as sì-i. [As an aside, I'd take Forvo with a pinch of salt.]


8

Il Dizionario d'ortografia e di pronunzia è utilissimo per questo tipo di dubbi. In particolare, conferma la pronuncia con l'accento tonico sulla “o” (e la “o” aperta) per Tremosine. Purtroppo il DOP non usa l'IPA come alfabeto fonetico: quella specie di “s” allungata denota la s “dolce” (cioè sonora). Infine, non sempre l'assenza di accento grafico, anche ...


8

This isn't a complete answer, but while Googling to try to find out more, I came across the following explanation for why some speakers might think there is a difference in pronunciation: The orthographic distinction between 'z' and 'zz' induces some speakers to distinguish length in pronunciation (spazi 'spaces' spatsi vs. spazzi 'you sweep' spattsi) ...


8

I assume you are talking about the pronunciation of the E in the second syllable. The change from [ɛ] in [sinˈtʃɛro] to [e] in [sintʃeraˈmente] is completely regular and predictable, because "standard"* Italian pronunciation includes a rule saying that [ɛ] and [ɔ] are only possible in the stressed syllable of a word. When suffixation causes the stress to ...


7

The phonetic system of standard Italian has seven vowels: a (in IPA, /a/), closed e (/e/), open e (/ɛ/), i (/i/), closed o (/o/), open o (/ɔ/), u (/u/). The accent is usually only written to denote the main stress on a word when it is on the last syllable, so you cannot normally graphically distinguish between botte meaning “barrel” (and pronounced /'bot:e/)...


6

Everything has been said already, however you ask when you should use ò vs. ó vs o (and, I guess, similarly for è vs. é etc.). In the case of "o" it's relatively easy: the only case where an accent needs to be written is if it's on the last letter of a word (with exceptions for monosyllables and a few other cases which however we won't go into here)...


6

If by "geminated" you mean that we have gemination, i.e. the consonant is doubled or has different length, then no, we don't. It's a whole different sound than "ll" in Italian. First, it's a Palatal lateral approximant, in that page you can hear a sample of what it sounds like. It's basically the sound you write as ll in Castillan ...


6

In Standard Italian they are indeed pronounced distinctly, but the distribution of open and closed vowels in Italian can vary greatly depending on the dialect (due to the influence of regional languages). Here are some examples of regions in which the different pronunciations of pèsca and pésca can be found: 🍑 pèsca = /ˈpɛska/ ≠ /ˈpeska/ = pésca 🎣 ...


6

Confermo empiricamente che a Roma (e, direi, almeno parte del Lazio) è un fenomeno piuttosto comune, ed è ben noto ai linguisti, insieme agli altri che caratterizzano il consonantismo dell'italiano di Roma: Da segnalare, ancora in comune con la varietà toscana, oltre che con quelle meridionali, la resa dell’affricata sorda come fricativa in posizione ...


6

Nell'italiano standard (quello derivato dal fiorentino) la s sorda e quella sonora – cioè, nell'IPA, /s/ e /z/ – sono due fonemi diversi. Esistono infatti “coppie minime”, come per esempio “chie[s]e” (passato di chiedere) e “chie[z]e” (edifici di culto). Questa differenza in varie parti d'Italia non è però sentita. Per citare l'Enciclopedia dell'italiano: ...


6

Main law about exceptions (MLAE) Every rule has its exceptions, including the main law about exceptions You'll find several applications of the MLAE when dealing with grammar or orthography. The trigraph sci is normally used for denoting the /ʃ/ phoneme in front of a, o or u (like for ci and gi). For etymological reasons, sciare has two syllables (sci-...


6

A good Italian pronunciation dictionary is DOP, Dizionario d’ortografia e di pronunzia della RAI. At this dictionary, you can see phonetic transcriptions and listen to the pronunciation of words.


6

In Standard Italian, in most cases, in a word beginning by “r” + vowel, the “r” is pronounced as a simple, non-geminate one. The “most cases” include the word in isolation, the word preceded by a consonant and, in the majority of the cases, the word preceded by a vowel. So, regalo, un regalo, quattro regali all are pronounced with a simple “r”. The ...


6

You have to distinguish between gemination in spelling and pronunciation. French has a lot of geminated consonants in spelling, but none in pronunciation (except maybe at word boundaries, when a word ends with the same consonant the next word begins with). The French word suppression comes directly from Latin subpressio/suppressio, where the second ...


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