23

Bravo or Brava means "Good job!". In English, it's often used as an exclamation in the theatre, but it doesn't have to be an exclamation, nor is it restricted to the theatre context.


19

First, cosa in Che cosa? is indeed a noun, used to reinforce the question. Since cosa means generally any object or action (analogue to "something" or "anything" in English), you can omit it without losing the meaning: Che? Cosa? Che cosa? What? Che (cosa) sta succedendo? What's (that, that is) happening? The verb cosare is used only if you don't ...


15

The rules are significantly different, which is why Italians speaking in English often get their articles wrong. Good news for you: the other way round is much easier. As a thumb rule, if you have an indefinite article in English, keep it in Italian; if you have a definite article, keep it in Italian; if you have no article in English, put a definite ...


14

In the specific case of your sentence, I'd probably simply translate «In genere mi vesto casual» (yes, casual is used in Italian too). As for the four verbs: “indossare” is more formal: you'd hardly use it in everyday speech; “vestire” is mostly used in the reflexive form (“mi vesto tutto di verde”); alternatively you can use it transitively with a person ...


14

Teachers say 'Ottimo!' or 'Eccellente!' or 'Ottimo lavoro!' or 'Lavoro eccellente!', but they also say 'Buon lavoro!' when a job is a 'Good job!'


13

Just to add to the other excellent answers: a simple translation as Bel lavoro! is also very common. So, good becomes beautiful/nice in the translation. On the other hand, "buon lavoro!" is used as an encouragement to someone who has to perform a task and you want to with her success.


12

From the Treccani vocabulary: grullo agg. [etimo incerto], tosc. – 1. Sciocco, semplicione; si dice soprattutto di persona che ha scarsa vivacità d’intelletto e di chi per eccessiva ingenuità si lascia facilmente ingannare o agisce a proprio svantaggio: quanto sei g.!; sei davvero g. se non capisci; sarei grulla se ti dessi retta; spesso sostantivato: è ...


11

There is no “rule” such as the one you suggest. An English gerund might often correspond to an Italian noun (“running is a healthy sport” > “la corsa è uno sport salutare”), or some phrase not involving an infinitive (“seeing is believing” > “se lo vedi, ci credi”; you might say “vedere è credere”, but it would sound wooden and as a calque from English), and ...


11

I generally lean towards the impersonal form in Italian. I think English can afford to use the personal form since it has the neutral gender (it), which is lacking in Italian. Using the personal form in Italian generally requires a gender to be defined. This is often arbitrary and in most cases just it doesn't feel right. Is Firefox a guy? Is Opera a lady? I ...


11

In the first example I'd use "Beh/be', è ora che io vada". For the other sentences "Allora" is fine, but you may also use "Dunque" which however is a bit more rude.


10

The Oxford Dictionary of English I have on my machine says dialect |ˈdʌɪəlɛkt| noun a particular form of a language which is peculiar to a specific region or social group: the Lancashire dialect seemed like a foreign language. In the Italian dictionary I find dialetto ‹dialètto› s.m. Sistema linguistico di ambito geografico limitato, ...


10

There's plenty. On the same lines of the example you cited, here some examples Non proprio intelligentissimo Non esattamente una decisione geniale Un risultato non eccezionale Or also Benone! which, depending on the tone, can be sarcastic or not. Bene ma non benissimo! is also a very typical ironic sentence, meaning neither good nor very ...


10

A common Italian expression is "Ben Fatto," or "well done." Here, the emphasis is on the adjectival modifier, "ben." Other expressions are "Bravo," "eccellente," or "ottimo," which are also adjectives. "Bel lavoro" is used, but is less common, because it would put the emphasis on "job," rather than "well" or "good."


9

In Italian the double negation is generally used with a negative meaning, like in the following examples Non conosco nessuno Non guardo mai la televisione Non posso farci niente The way you can think about this is to consider the first negation as not having effect on anything else apart from the verb. With this "rule", the non only serve the ...


9

In addition to what I.M. already put in his answer I wanted to add that a generic overdue time is often called "ritardo". This is valid in many cases: "The job was completed past its due time" = "il lavoro è stato finito in ritardo" "She arrived late" = "(Lei) è arrivata in ritardo" and many other cases generically referring to something that was ...


9

In Italian, masculine + feminine = masculine plural: e.g., il tavolo e la sedia bianchi. It is probably more common to encounter this construction with a copula (il tavolo e la sedia sono bianchi), but it is correct also for modifiers. See e.g. on the Treccani site for a grammar reference: • Se i nomi sono di genere diverso, l’aggettivo si declina al ...


8

The verb "Cosare" doesn't really exist in Italian. Or, at least, it isn't used. To translate the English verb "to do" in Italian, we use the verb "fare"; the verb "fare" is used to indicate generic actions. For example, Facciamo matematica is a generic form for Studiamo matematica. In this sense, the verb "cosare" is simply unused. For this reason, Google ...


8

As you can read here, there is a subtle difference regarding the syntax: ["poiché" si adopera] per introdurre una prop. causale che precede la principale: poiché la pensi così, lascio decidere a te (quando invece la propr. causale segue la principale si preferisce «perché»: lascio decidere a te perché so come la pensi I'll try to translate it: ["...


8

Not really sure why you are disappointed... but that is the word commonly used and I am not aware of any common synonym, unless you use a periphrasis and say collezionista di libri. On the issue of whether it is a French loan-word I am not completely sure, but then again, the French word comes from Greek as well (βιβλίον "book" and ϕιλία "love"). I could ...


8

I would translate it as: I have no regrets about the people whom I've lost over time, but I regret the time I've lost with certain people.


8

I must admit that, as an Italian, I am not sure about the difference between “cake” and “pie” (apart from specific cases). In fact, I find the two images quite similar and both look like particular kinds of torte, while there are other torte that are much more different than those two differ between them. It so happens that different languages partition ...


7

Well, here is my 2 cents: Cosare is very informal and slightly humorous in tone. I find if very hard to capture its tone in English, and as a native speaker of Italian I think that "doing stuff with the thing" doesn't quite cut it, although it's pretty close. The thing is, "cosa" is a noun which is used as a verb, which is somewhat less ...


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